Posts Tagged ‘fear’

Teresa Jade LeYung’s Blog post #602

2021 Jan. 16, 03:06 -04:29; Jan. 26, 00:19;   Feb. 2, 22:08;  Feb. 15, 00:19-03:24; Feb 16, 20:02; Feb 19, 21:43; Feb 20; 21; 22; 23

The more I learn about our beautiful brains (I call them “BB”s), the more grateful I am to every person who has shown me kindness, imparted knowledge, taught me a skill, inspired me to pursue Beauty.

Unbeknownst to me at the time …  my embracing words from nonjudgmental people and my reading the books listed below (near the end of this blog post)    provided a vital network for my BB to collect new information from precious people in my life, and, from newer books, webinars and training (also listed near the end of this post) as I learn to connect Body with Beautiful Brain.

From all these inspiring people, my BB has deciphered a common message  -  so simple so powerful, yet, not easy to master (it hasn’t been easy for me) — the sweet message is that I hold the power to use my own thoughts to experience bliss during and after illness, wherever I am.

[ from page 4 of the workbook TRANSFORMING THE BRAIN IN PAIN: NEUROPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION, Dr. Michael H. Moskowitz  and Dr. Marla D. Golden enlighten: “Without your brain, there is no pain. Your brain doesn’t just receive information from your body, but sends directions back out to tell your body what to do. Your brain ‘reads’ everything going on in your body 30 times a second for your entire life. The adult brain changes throughout our lives based upon the information it receives from our bodies. We only experience pain when the electrical signals reach the thinking part of our brains.” ]

Dear Reader, you might have already read in the blog posts preceding this one . . . I am in training – to rid persistent (chronic) pain and other unpleasant signals that began as Shingles last year.

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**http://www.neuroplastix.com/**

Above graphics is from page 69 of Dr. Moskowitz’s and Dr. Golden’s workbook TRANSFORMING THE BRAIN IN PAIN: NEUROPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.  The word “BLISS” is above the word “Anandamide

Dr. Michael H. Moskowitz  and Dr. Marla D. Golden show us how Anandamide is synthesized and released at synapses – blocking inflammation, shutting off long term potentiation, reverting Microglia.  http://www.neuroplastix.com/

synapses = the spaces between cells where information (through release of chemicals/electrical signals) is passed. Brain has 100 billion nerve cells and 1000 trillion synapses. Every synapse is used to pass information around the brain and the body.

long term potentiation =  persistent strengthening of synapses based on recent patterns of activity

Microglia (on page 30 of workbook) = one of the three types of glial cells – unlike the nerve cells (called Neurons), glial cells do not conduct electrical signals. Microglia are located around blood vessels in the brain (Capillaries) in an inactive form, responding to foreign invaders by activating and changing shape to attack and destroy anything not recognized as belonging in the brain. They also use pinpoint releases of inflammatory chemicals to break old synapses to prepare for the formation of new ones.

[ Global Traveler/Adventurer and Certified Tour Director Sasa Southard will smile when she reads thisAnandamide is present in highest concentrations in chocolate, especially raw chocolate, where two other enzymes slow down its metabolic deactivation.]

 

Dr. Danielle Rosenman says:

“The brain changes itself constantly throughout our entire lives. All of our experience changes the brain.

  • Everything that we experience, think, feel, believe, and learn changes the physical structure of the brain, the chemicals in the brain, and electricity in the brain.

  • This ability of the brain to change is called neuroplasticity.

Neuroplasticity lets us learn through our entire lives.  The more often we repeat a task, the better we learn it. Repetition helps us learn things like reading, adding numbers, or playing a musical instrument. We often call this type of learning ‘practice’.

Professor Lorimer Moseley says: “The mechanisms that cause us to change in a good way can also cause us to change in a way that makes our lives more difficult and more unpleasant….  Our brain produces pain.  Pain is our most sophisticated protective device. Your systems learn how to make pain….”

Dr. Moskowitz and Dr. Golden say: “The more sensation each part of your body has, the bigger the image of that body part in your brain (page 4 of workbook) … Shrink the pain map by flooding the brain using: …thoughts, images, senses, memories, soothing emotions, movement, beliefs. (page 13 of workbook) “ 

Thank you, Dr. Rosenman, for having  coached me.

My job is to interrupt pain and other unpleasant signals by using any of the seven modalities or a combination of them.

- THOUGHTS
- IMAGES
- SENSES
- MEMORIES
- SOOTHING EMOTIONS
- MOVEMENT
- BELIEFS

Dr. Rosenman adds: “Smile for yourself and talk out loud to your Brain.”

The techniques work – I no longer have to take analgesics when I feel a headache coming on or pain (out-of-nowhere kind of pain) in my knee.   I use soothing/confident touch. My BB just needs “feedback” from me – “I have not injured myself, there’s no need to ‘protect’ me by sending me unpleasant signals.” I place a hand on my forehead or a hand over my kneecap for a minute – voila!  BB stops sending pain signals.

I’ve come to appreciate talking to my own brain.  I need to practice and be good at it. After all, if BB has been working so hard  all my life, the least I can do is communicate back.

I need to master the techniques to interrupt the new persistent unpleasant sensations in Body;  since Beautiful Brain produces the sensations, I need to give BB “BLISS”.

Right now, BLISS is thinking about walking and gawking in Paris.

On January 11, 2019, in my blog post “We’ll Always Have Paris, Darling Friends,” says Teresa Jade LeYung, Part 2″  I  had written “I shall publish part 3 soon, not two years from now.” Today is February 19, 2021. It has been more than two years.

The photos in the remainder of this post help me remember those times; sending my thoughts to those pleasurable experiences helps me interrupt undesirable signals. As beloved actress Dame Angela Lansbury says in an interview at Studio 10 (Australia): “We live the memories of our lives.”

Thank you to my friends (and their friends) who made my times in Paris that much more memorable. To friends who had scheduled time to be with me last year and this year…but we had to cancel…   When pandemic is really over … we’ll walk and gawk! To friends and mentors who cannot travel, I shall bring back mementos.

I wish everyone and your BBs easy access to BLISS via thoughts, images, senses, memories, soothing emotions, movement, and beliefs.

À bientôt!

 

Thank you, kind strangers, who helped us captured moments. Boulevard Saint-Michel led us to Rue de la Huchette - aromas from hundreds of eateries! My BB remembers. Walking on cobble stones - author/photographer Margie Yee Webb, global adventurer Sasa Southard, and story-theme consultant Teresa Jade LeYung. Merci beaucoup, Sasa, for giving us a dream tour of City of Light in 2016.

Mere thought of smelling, seeing, savoring fresh bread in Paris brings BLISS

author/photographer Margie Yee Webb, her sister Anna, global traveler Sasa Southard, and story-theme consultant Teresa Jade LeYung -- admirers of The Iron Lady "la Tour Eiffel" (Paris 2017)

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author/journalist Scott James (aka Kemble Scott), author/photographer Margie Yee Webb, story-theme consultant/author Teresa Jade LeYung, global adventurer/author Sasa Southard, and, Margie's sister Anna! Avenue de la Republique, 75011 Paris

The Water Lily (les Nymphéas) Pond at Giverny, home village of beloved painter Claude Monet, in the town of Vernon, France

Liste des plantes et des fleurs du jardin de Claude Monet / List of plants and flowers of Claude Monet’s garden  http://giverny.org/gardens/fcm/planjard.htm

 

Joy is gawking at the architecture in Paris. That's Sasa at the balcony! I was on the street photographing and filming.

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Sasa Southard https://sasasouthard.com/ is a descendant of the Dumas of France. The Dumas Metro station is near Père Lachaise cemetery

Happiness is finding fabric and ribbons in Paris - photo of Teresa Jade LeYung by Sasa Southard

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To ride buses in Paris is to give my eyes pleasure

big windows and views of greenery is bliss

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Postcards sold in shops and at newsstands / kiosks (Presse) in Paris mesmerize me

Global Adventurer Sasa Southard https://sasasouthard.com/ is most fond of the 5th arrondissement and visiting the Panthéon - photo by Theme Consultant Teresa Jade LeYung

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Developmental Editor / Book Doctor Vicki Weiland - Wish you were there!

 

 

Kathy et Nan let me filmed them walking on avenue Gabriel, Paris

Teresa Jade LeYung, Nan, Kathy at Opéra Garnier aka Palais Garnier, Paris. I learned "why" ballet performances start at 8pm.

 

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Global Adventurer Sasa Southard brimming with joy, having been to Institut de Français, Villefranche-sur-Mer

 

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**Teresa Jade LeYung in front of Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris (BHVP), 24 rue Pavée, Paris 75004 (photo by Nan or Sasa)**

 

Olga Malyj treated us (her niece Nicole and Nicole’s husband, artist Cynthia Tom, and me) to evening tour on la Seine! Merci beaucoup, chère Olga!

Artist Cynthia Tom http://yourwritingmentor.com/ in front of Max Chaoul Couture, Paris - photo by Teresa_Jade_LeYung_2019

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Seeing pink roses in Madame H's lovely flat is bliss. Merci beaucoup, Madame H! They remind me of my Number One Angel!

Thanks to LaH for wanting to visit le musée du Louvre, I got to see the remarkable painting by Eugène Delacroix, Le 28 Juillet: "La Liberté guidant le peuple". I treasure the memento in the form of a folder. Homelife in Madam H's lovely flat was bliss.

https://www.louvre.fr/en/mediaimages/eugene-delacroix-le-28-juillet-la-liberte-guidant-le-peuple-musee-du-louvre

Merci beaucoup, Sasa! for treating us (Sasa's brother and nephew and friends and Olga and me) to hear jazz singer Isabelle Seleskovitch! So many other experiences... Merci, Sasa!

Merci beaucoup, Madame Hamou, for letting us meet you! I wish you and everyone around you excellent health and bliss!

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Merci beaucoup, LaH et Sasa, for posing for me.

Merci beaucoup, LaH et Sharon, for posing in front of Ladurée, avenue des Champs Elysées

author and writing coach Mary E. Knippel http://yourwritingmentor.com/ near Pont Alexandre III - photo by theme consultant Teresa Jade LeYung, September 2019

Nan et Mary E. Knippel immensely enjoyed Berthe Marisot exhibition at le Musée d'Orsay. Merci, Sasa, for introducing me to this beloved artist!

Nan loves to visit le Musée d'Orsay - photo by theme consultant Teresa Jade LeYung

Paris !

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Margie Yee Webb, Sasa Southard, Teresa Jade LeYung at Nuit Blanche so happy to see Daniel Buren's installation with their own eyes (2019 Paris) - magical photo of magical moment by MYW!

Sasa et Margie at Pierre Hermé, 86 Av. des Champs-Élysées

Paris !

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artist MT and artist Chandra Garsson https://www.facebook.com/butterflybonesandhummingbirdsongs, I just know you would have loved experiencing Vincent van Gogh's paintings projected onto walls and floors at l'Atelier des Lumières Paris https://www.atelier-lumieres.com/en (unique art center presenting classic pieces in immersive music)

La Tour Eiffel, I dream of you!

Paris!

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Teresa Jade LeYung says: "Eating a sandwich in Paris is bliss." - photo by Mary E. Knippel

Mere thought of smelling, seeing, eating quiche in Paris brings BLISS

Cakes at Angelina

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Thank you, Chi Nei Tsang practitioner Marie-Christine Cornet, for showing me Espace des femmes Antoinette Fouque https://www.espace-des-femmes.fr/

Paroisse Saint-Ambroise in 11th arrondissement, photo_by_Teresa_Jade_LeYung 2019_Paris

Looking out Madame Puech's kitchen window is bliss.

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Postcards sold at newsstands / kiosks (Presse) or in shops mesmerize me

Parc Monceau, I dream of you!

Choosing postcards to send to friends is a joyful ritual when I am in Paris

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Mere thought of smelling, seeing, savoring croissant, pain au chocolat, brioche in Paris brings BLISS

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THE BOOKS:

CONSTRUCTIVE LIVINGOutgrow Shyness, Depression, Fear, Stress, Grief, Chronic Pain (by David K. Reynolds),

LOVING WHAT IS: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life (by Byron Katie and Stephen Mitchell),

THE FOUR AGREEMENTS: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom a Toltec Wisdom Book (by Don Miguel Ruiz), 

MY DREAMS: A Simple Guide to Dream Interpretation ( by Angie Choi )

THE BOOKS:

Dr. Michael Moskowitz‘s and Dr. Marla Golden‘s workbook  - TRANSFORMING THE BRAIN IN PAIN: NEUROPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION (also their webinars and brain graphics)

Dr. Danielle Rosenman‘s 10-page guide “Neuroplasticity: Change the Brain to Heal from Pain, Illness, Anxiety, and Depression”  https://www.medicalcounseling.net/

Dr. Norman Doidge’s first book – The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (translated into 26 languages)

Dr. Norman Doidge’s second book – The Brain’s Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity (translated into 19 languages so far)

Dr. Victoria Sweet‘s 2 books -  SLOW MEDICINE The Way to Healing   and   GOD’S HOTEL: A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine 

 

Thank you to the healers and the people who led me to them, then and now:

Dr. Susan Thackrey! Thanks to my sister for finding my first healer for me!

All the caring physicians who have retired.

All the kindhearted mentors!!!

Loduskia “Dusky” Pierce, MFT  http://www.duskyswondersite.com/

Reiki Masters and authors Kim McMillon, Lakshmi Kerner, Martha Alderson; BrainGym teacher and memoirist Luisa Adams

Naomi Schaeffer Draper, M.S. Physical Therapist, for teaching me Feldenkrais techniques

Dr. Amy Grace Lam, vibrational energy healer http://amygracelam.com/

Artist and Curator Cynthia Tom’s program of transformation A PLACE OF HER OWN https://www.aplaceofherown.org/

Marie-Christine Cornet (now in France) Chi Nei Tsang and Somatic Experience practitioner http://www.mariechristinecornet.com/

Stephanie Doucette, M.S., L.Ac., Dipl. OM, is a California Licensed Acupuncturist and Clinical Herbalist http://stephaniedoucette.com/ 

Dr. Madele Limpahan

Dr. Danielle Rosenman‘s coaching  https://www.medicalcounseling.net

and all the other healers in my life who happen to be precious friends and relatives!

 

I wish everyone and your BBs easy access to BLISS via thoughts, images, senses, memories, soothing emotions, movement, and beliefs.

Thank you for reading “Story Continuity / Theme Consultant Teresa Jade LeYung says ‘Be kind to our beautiful brains.’”

For other posts related to our Beautiful Brains and Neuroplasticity  in my blog  https://lovemadeofheart.com/blog …  If you look at right side of screen, you’ll see the category “Beautiful Brains Neuroplasticity”.  Please click on that category to get all my blog posts pertaining to the topic.

Thank you, MT et MYW, for masks; Starry Night mask by Dahlynn of WoodstockAndYarn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love Made Of Heart ®

Teresa Jade LeYung, an American naturalized citizen of Chinese ancestry, is a story/theme consultant, author of LOVE MADE OF HEART (daughter-mother novel archived at the San Francisco History Center and used by college professors), BUILD YOUR WRITER’S PLATFORM & FANBASE IN 22 DAYS (a workbook), and TALKING TO MY DEAD MOM Monologues (the first monologue received an award from Redwood Writers Ten-Minute Play Festival), an alumna of artist Cynthia Tom’s A PLACE OF HER OWN, an advocate for public libraries and public schools, creator of http://lovemadeofheart.com/blog/ , and, admirer of City of Light. Composing Haiku poems is a new love for LeYung.

November 15, 2009

A week ago, I saw a plastic bag of dog poop sitting beside the curb in front of my home. Well, whoever left it there probably had an emergency to take care of (maybe the dog ran off to chase a squirrel and so the human had to run after the dog). No doubt, the following day when human and dog come by on their walk, the human would see the abandoned bag and say to himself/herself: “Oh, look. I’ll dispose of this today.”

Another two days go by.  The bag is now flattened (probably by a neighbor’s tire) and some of the poop has oozed out.
What is it with dog poop in my path?

Last year, dog excrement (sans bag) was sitting on the sidewalk at the corner. I almost stepped on it when I was approaching the trunk of my car to get my walking shoes. After my walk around the neighborhood, I called my Constructive Living Instructor Patricia Ryan Madson. “Patricia,” I asked, “Am I supposed to pick it up?”
Patricia didn’t have to answer. I just wanted to hear the logic:  In practicing Constructive Living, I could stay annoyed (in this case–a neighbor has not picked up after his/her pet) or I could “take care of what’s in front of me.”  My friend Marie Elena Gaspari (also a writing coach) speaks the same wisdom.

Today, I told my hubby about what’s lying on the street.  He offered to dispose of the mess.  I knew “who” needed to clean the mess.
It’s late afternoon now.   I know that when I go outside again, I will see a clean street because I took care of what was in front of me.

As a writing coach, I remind myself that in a story the protagonist has to be the one who takes action or suffer the consequences of being a “passive character.”

How can dog poop help your writing?  Don’t let your protagonist be passive.

The book – Constructive Living: Outgrow Shyness, Depression, Fear, Stress, Grief, Chronic Pain by David K. Reynolds.  Achieve the goal of Constructive Living – to do everything well. Western world Dr. Reynolds had combined two of the most popular forms of therapy in Japan.



Cheers from

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan is the author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW. Click here for print edition. Click here for Kindle edition. “Reach out, not stress out.”

Teresa’s novel Love Made of Heart: a Mother’s Mental Illness Forges Forgiveness in Daughter Ruby is used in college courses and archived at the San Francisco History Center.

Subscribe to  “Coach Teresa’s blog” Click here to start.

 

Writing colleague Pamela Reitman had emailed me the invitation to this half-day symposium. The words on the flyer hooked me. “Building a Caring Community for Mental Illness,” “open to everyone,” “this conference is FREE,” and “light refreshments will be provided.”
And, I didn’t have to be Jewish to attend this event at Congregation Beth Sholom in San Francisco August 30, 2009 Noon-5:30pm.  “Open to everyone” said the invitation.  I would go with my mom watching over me.
In my first novel Love Made of Heart, I had fictionalized my mother’s story, her battling with mental illness, my role as a witness to her suffering. Whenever I give talks on the book, I make the statement: “I advocate compassion for mental illness.”  The conference would give me an

Pam Reitman greets community of mental health advocates

Pam Reitman greets community of mental health advocates

opportunity to meet a spectrum of advocates for mental health.

My impressions and memories of the day:
2 friends carpooled with me.  It was already minutes past noon when I drove up to 301 14th Ave. at Clement St.  I dropped off my friends.   Scanning down the street, I was ready to park many blocks from the Beth Sholom. I couldn’t believe my eyes when half a block down the street, there was a space!  Mom! My parking angel!
Who drives by looking for parking but another friend I had shared the invitation with.
The first person I encountered was a volunteer who opened the glass door and greeted me with a smile.  “Here for the conference?” he asked.  “Up the stairs to the Koret Hall.”
My friends were signing in.  A volunteer handed me a program and welcomed me. I chatted with another volunteer who asked me “Teresa, what do you do?”  “I write stories for those who cannot speak for themselves.”  She told me about her son’s experience at camp—how the one activity he could connect with was story-telling.
A female voice from stage announced the start of the conference. Pam Reitman looked lovely in a black/white/sage Piccaso-ish dress. She welcomed us, told us about the committee’s dedication to making the conference a reality, the history of Bay Area Jewish Healing Center, her personal story. It was hearing Pam’s personal story several years ago that had attracted me to her writing about mental illness.
Rabbi Hyman greeted us with “Nachamu, Nachamu” (Comfort, Comfort).”  He and Rabbi Kukla did in fact create an atmosphere of comfort.  I even sang along a simple song in Hebrew.  A cello player.

Rabbi Hymand and Rabbi Kukla say: "Nachamu, Nachamu"

Rabbi Hymand and Rabbi Kukla say: "Nachamu, Nachamu"

6 panelists shared personal stories.
“I didn’t know we had mental illness in the family until my father suffered from depression, then I found out that his father had mental illness. I had clinical depression after I gave birth.”
“Friends and neighbors bring food when you have a broken leg. They don’t when you have mental illness.”
“There’s stigma on mental illness even among physicians. When I was in medical school, I knew I wanted to be a psychiatrist, but, my classmates looked down at me because they were going to be general practitioners and surgeons.”
“I thought that what I was going through was typical teenage misery. Then in grad school I was feeling happy and confident for the first time, but, I wasn’t sleeping, I wasn’t eating, and I was talking to myself. I thought I was the reincarnation of the person that I was writing about in a research paper; that’s when I knew that something was strange. The book An Unquiet Mind catapulted me to call my friend and seek help. Ten years later, I went back to grad school and became a doctor.”
“Stigmas.  We hide behind the illness, knowing other people would ostracize us. We wouldn’t have to hide behind other illnesses.”
“Psychic history.” “Holocaust survivors… intergenerational healing.”
The audience was given index cards to write questions for the 6 panelists. After several questions were addressed, and the volunteers were collecting more cards from the audience, there was silence. Rabbi Hyman said there was no hurry to fill the moment with words. Filling the moment with silence was lovely.
More questions and responses.
“Isolation.”  “Shame.” “Hope.”
“Some people think we have to find meaning in every experience. What about finding leap of faith instead?”
“Stigma.”
“When I don’t hear from my son, I double-up the efforts to call him.”
“You can continue communicating even though your loved one is not.”
“There’s no distinction in the way I treat this person and that person. I treat everyone with respect.”

Pam Reitman & Teresa LeYung Ryan write about loved ones with mental illness

Pam Reitman & Teresa LeYung Ryan write about loved ones with mental illness

Refreshments. Pineapple, watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, strawberries. Danishes, glazed donuts.  I chatted with a yoga teacher. We talked about our moms—how much we miss them.
Breakout sessions.   I was in the group facilitated by Steve Foreman and Sharon Roth. In the library. 11 in the group. We sat in a circle. “What would you like to suggest to the planning committee to make this conference more assessable?” “How to connect with folks who are isolated?” “Volunteerism.” “NAMI” “Why is it when I read a news item about a violent crime, there’s mentioning that the suspect has mental illness as though it’s implied that mental illness leads to violence…?”
“What else can we do to help build a caring community for mental illness if we don’t have time to volunteer?” “Call or email legislative representatives and remind them to include mental health in healthcare reform.” “Share stories.” “Create a blog and invite everyone to tell their mental illness story. Offer resources on the blog.”
Then we gathered in the Main Sanctuary to hear reports from all the breakout sessions. Closing ritual that included prayers and songs.  During prayers, I saw my mom on a swing!  That was the first time I pictured her in that playful act.
A lovely day indeed.
It’s Wednesday, Sept. 2nd, and I Googled “An Unquiet Mind” (the book that had helped Dr. Karin Tamerius, one of the panelist on Sunday).  YouTube had “Personal Reflections on Manic-Depressive Illness” from the Research Channel series.  Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison told her personal story. Such courage to open up about her disease (mania, suicidal depression) and her struggles with medication (side effect that were severely debilitating) that ultimately helped her. Stigmas. Personal and professional reprisals.  Who else could really understand what the patients are experiencing?  She ended her speech about the role of love in recovery.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxRLap9xLag
I’m thinking about Carmen Lee’s organization:  Stamp Out Stigma  http://stampoutstigma.org/
and National Alliance of Mental Illess   http://nami.org/
and my mom.

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