Posts Tagged ‘stress’

Talk about writers collaborating and having fun… Barbara Whittaker, GM of The Axe & Palm Café, Stanford University, created a literary series and invited yours truly Teresa LeYung Ryan, author of Love Made of Heart, to kick-off the new program on November 12, 2009. Dear friend Elisa Southard, author of Break Through the Noise: 9 Tools to Propel Your Marketing Message, showed up to take photos and video. What a delightful evening.  My hubby was there to record and cheer.

Teresa LeYung Ryan shows Chinese word for "love" and Barbara Whittaker holds Teresa's novel Love Made of Heart

Teresa LeYung Ryan shows Chinese word for "love" and Barbara Whittaker holds Teresa's novel Love Made of Heart

Stanford students Natalia, Chana Rose, Zach with Teresa LeYung Ryan (middle) and Barbara Whittaker (right)

Stanford students Natalia, Chana Rose, Zach with Teresa LeYung Ryan (middle) and Barbara Whittaker (right)

small photo Lyle Ryan & Teresa LeYung Ryan photo by Elisa Southard

Lyle Ryan & Teresa LeYung Ryan

Stanford students Natalia Birgisson, Chana Rose Rabinovitz and Zach O’Keeffe read scenes with me. These young people made a deep impression on me.

David, thank you for setting up P/A system; Anthony, thank you for tranforming space; Scott (Barbara’s hubby), thank you for helping with sound-check. Friends who couldn’t attend, thank you for sweet  emails and voicemails.

Stanford students & The Axe & Palm Cafe staff are memorable characters.

The heroes & heroines at The Axe & Palm Cafe with Teresa and Barbara, photo by Elisa

The heroes & heroines at The Axe & Palm Cafe with Teresa and Barbara, photo by Elisa

Everyone at Stanford who contributed their time and energy also deserve praise.

QUESTIONS that I answered:

  • Is Love Made of Heart autobiographical?
  • Where do you get your ideas for stories?
  • What other genres do you write?
  • What advice would you give to aspiring writers?
  • You write about sobering subject matters; what do you do for fun?

A portion of the proceeds from book sales was donated to Save-the-Libraries.

Thank you, Barbara Whittaker, for further promoting literacy and sharing your brainchild with us!

Stanford student Mitchell Holt represented Marketing Dept. with authors Teresa LeYung Ryan & Elisa Southard

Stanford student Mitchell Holt represented Marketing Dept. with authors Teresa LeYung Ryan & Elisa Southard

November 15, 2009

A week ago, I saw a plastic bag of dog poop sitting beside the curb in front of my home. Well, whoever left it there probably had an emergency to take care of (maybe the dog ran off to chase a squirrel and so the human had to run after the dog). No doubt, the following day when human and dog come by on their walk, the human would see the abandoned bag and say to himself/herself: “Oh, look. I’ll dispose of this today.”

Another two days go by.  The bag is now flattened (probably by a neighbor’s tire) and some of the poop has oozed out.
What is it with dog poop in my path?

Last year, dog excrement (sans bag) was sitting on the sidewalk at the corner. I almost stepped on it when I was approaching the trunk of my car to get my walking shoes. After my walk around the neighborhood, I called my Constructive Living Instructor Patricia Ryan Madson. “Patricia,” I asked, “Am I supposed to pick it up?”
Patricia didn’t have to answer. I just wanted to hear the logic:  In practicing Constructive Living, I could stay annoyed (in this case–a neighbor has not picked up after his/her pet) or I could “take care of what’s in front of me.”  My friend Marie Elena Gaspari (also a writing coach) speaks the same wisdom.

Today, I told my hubby about what’s lying on the street.  He offered to dispose of the mess.  I knew “who” needed to clean the mess.
It’s late afternoon now.   I know that when I go outside again, I will see a clean street because I took care of what was in front of me.

As a writing coach, I remind myself that in a story the protagonist has to be the one who takes action or suffer the consequences of being a “passive character.”

How can dog poop help your writing?  Don’t let your protagonist be passive.

The book – Constructive Living: Outgrow Shyness, Depression, Fear, Stress, Grief, Chronic Pain by David K. Reynolds.  Achieve the goal of Constructive Living – to do everything well. Western world Dr. Reynolds had combined two of the most popular forms of therapy in Japan.



Cheers from

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan is the author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW. Click here for print edition. Click here for Kindle edition. “Reach out, not stress out.”

Teresa’s novel Love Made of Heart: a Mother’s Mental Illness Forges Forgiveness in Daughter Ruby is used in college courses and archived at the San Francisco History Center.

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