Posts Tagged ‘movies’

2022 December 1, 15:03;  December 3, 22:20 California USA – Writing Coach Teresa’s Blog post #617

Teresa Jade LeYung says:

“World Traveler / Teacher / Researcher / Writer / Photographer SASA SOUTHARD’s referencing Villefranche-sur-Mer leads to Jean Cocteau, La Belle et la Bête, films, movies, and Almost Ginger blog”

Wishes of vibrant health to everyone!

Thank you, Sasa Southard!  YOU inspire turning curiosity into fun research!

https://sasasouthard.com/

Recently while looking at links and photos provided by Sasa … I learned that Villefranche-sur-Mer is a harbour town and Mediterranean resort, in the Alpes-Maritimes département, Provence–Alpes–Côte d’Azur région, southeastern FRANCE.

https://www.britannica.com/place/Villefranche-sur-Mer says: “Villefranche, a picturesque old town, was founded early in the 14th century. Its ancient Saint-Pierre chapel was entirely decorated by the French 20th-century writer and artist Jean Cocteau.”

… which led to finding the 4-part presentation COCTEAU ET LA CHAPELLE DE VILLEFRANCHE : L’EGLISE ET LE POETE – in French language

Here’s Part 1 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9s2HLSMVPwU

Thank you, YouTube Channel User Chrétiens à Monaco!

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Then YouTube cued up “Jean Cocteau speaks to the year 2000″  subtitled – 1962 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-x-wNiN4Hk

In 1962 Monsieur Cocteau was addressing a future audience! Wow!   Thank you, YouTube Channel User Camille P-LB!

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Today, I found on YouTube the film written and directed by Jean Cocteau   ORPHÉE / ORPHEUS (1950) with subtitles / subtítulos / Untertitel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IZIwV7c3os

Thank you, YouTube Channel User John Potter!

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Then, while looking up other films written by Monsieur Jean Cocteau https://www.criterion.com/films/610-orpheus, I see that the hauntingly beautiful film La Belle et la Bête was also written by Monsieur Cocteau

https://www.criterion.com/films/177-beauty-and-the-beast  says:

Jean Cocteau’s sublime adaptation of Mme. Leprince de Beaumont’s fairy-tale masterpiece—in which the pure love of a beautiful girl melts the heart of a feral but gentle beast—is a landmark of motion picture fantasy, with unforgettably romantic performances by Jean Marais and Josette Day. The spectacular visions of enchantment, desire, and death in Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bête) have become timeless icons of cinematic wonder.”

 

On the Making of Beauty and the Beast https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/17-on-the-making-of-beauty-and-the-beast

An excerpt from   COCTEAU: A BIOGRAPHY (1970) by Francis Steegmuller

“Beauty and the Beast, the first film of Cocteau’s own since The Blood of a Poet, and his finest poem since then, is by general consent one of the most enchanting pictures ever made, and its production was one of those undertakings that, with a kind of general benevolence, shed luster on all its participants. It brought new accolades to Mme Leprince de Beaumont, the eighteenth-century author of the fairy tale….”

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Then as Sasa Southard would say …  I circled back to “Côte d’Azur région, southeastern France”  and found “Almost Ginger” blog!

TO CATCH A THIEF  filming locations in the South of France https://almostginger.com/to-catch-a-thief-film-locations-cannes/

Almost Ginger is an award-nominated cinema and travel blog aimed at showing film and TV lovers how their silver screen escapes can be a reality by documenting my own travels to filming locations and film festivals around the world.

https://almostginger.com/  says: “Almost Ginger is run by me, Rebecca Sharp. I’m a twenty-something avid cinephile and traveller, as well as a minimalist, optimist, Hufflepuff and proud ginger. Well, almost ginger. Originally from the Lake District in the UK, I split my time between there and everywhere else! I’m a full-time blogger and freelance content creator so as long as I have my laptop, I can work anywhere.”

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Thank you!  World Traveler / Teacher / Researcher / Writer / Photographer Sasa Southard!

I celebrate YOU!

Did you know that Elisa “Sasa” Southard is the Queen of Talking Taglines and the author of classic “marketing / build your career by being YOU” book?

 

Elisa "Sasa" Southard--photo by Writers' Fanbase-Building Coach Teresa Jade LeYung

Ms. Southard’s book Break Through the Noise: 9 Tools to Propel Your Marketing Message contains entertaining and logical roadmaps for anyone who has anything or any service to sell. The beauty of Ms. Southard’s coaching is that, instead of giving us cookie-cutter methods, she guides us to focus on our uniqueness and to build from there. Anyone can be successful with Ms. Southard’s Tips on talking points and taglines

https://www.amazon.com/Break-Through-Noise-Elisa-Southard/dp/8130905094/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

 

Elisa Sasa Southard’s book BREAK THROUGH THE NOISE: 9 Tools to Propel Your Marketing Message had inspired me, Teresa Jade LeYung, to write my workbook BUILD YOUR WRITER’S PLATFORM & FANBASE IN 22 DAYS: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0983010005/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1670848622&sr=8-1

Wishing everyone a safe and peaceful December!

Jade - photo by Sasa Southard

Sincerely,

Teresa Jade LeYung

Story Theme Consultant / Photo Historian / Author / Public Library and Public School Advocate
http://www.OurBeautifulBrains.com goes to Teresa’s Blog
Writing Coach Teresa Jade LeYung says: “I love helping writers identify the themes in their manuscripts to hook readers, and, build and fortify their platforms before and after publication. Reach out, not stress out.”

Love Made Of Heart ®

 

Thank you to my pal Simone for this report:

“The State of COVID & the Triple-demic: A Conversation w/ Your Local Epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina” https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vu4rK8dAgnU&utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email  Thank you, Dr. Robert Wachter, chair, UCSF Dept of Medicine

 

Info about Long COVID and boosters from
Dr. Erica Pan, state epidemiologist, CA Dept of Public Health
and
Dr. Robert Wachter, chair, UC S.F. Dept of Medicine.
at Senator Skinner’s virtual Town Hall ”COVID What Now?”

“COVID Raises Risk of Long-Term Brain Injury, Large U.S. Study Finds” by Julie Steenhuysen https://www.usnews.com/news/top-news/articles/2022-09-22/covid-raises-risk-of-long-term-brain-injury-large-u-s-study-finds

Master teacher and practitioner of Chi Nei Tsang GILLES MARIN’s blog post: “Detoxifying from Vaccines with Herbs, Fruits and Vegetables”

https://www.chineitsang.com/post/detoxifying-from-vaccines-with-herbs-fruits-and-vegetables

 

 

Writing Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan here . . . to give writers an analogy for  “flashbacks” and how to show them with ease. This blog post is inspired by a lovely author from my “For Theme’s Sake” class who has a remarkable story.

First, the definition of “flashback” for story-tellers:

  • interruption of chronological sequence by interjection of events of earlier occurrence

Even though a golden rule  in story-telling is to avoid using flashbacks, sometimes the majority of the story is presented through one flowing flashback.

Here’s the analogy:

I’m composing a letter to a dear friend  who has asked me: “Tell me what all has happened to you since I last saw you seven years ago?”

I think back to seven years ago. My letter = one big flashback. To create story-flow, I shall tell my friend what has been happening in chronological order.

Perhaps I have been battling illness the past seven years, seeking various modalities for relief, and building new relationships. I’ll tell her about major events (plot points) from 2009, then 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014. I shall end the letter with what’s happening this year 2015.

[ As Plot Whisperer Martha Alderson reminds us . . . “Without cause and effect there is no plot. Without cause and effect, events are simply episodic happenings.”]

In my letter, I would be summarizing my journey  chronologically. To tell the story out of chronology would definitely confuse my friend.  I could skip over years if there were no major plot points, however, still keeping chronology – for example: I could write (relating to 2010, 2011, 2012) “For the next 3 years I kept my routine.”

In writing a book, I would be writing “scenes” chronologically, using summary to skip over time. Summary is not a substitute for a scene.

If I tell/show my flashbacks out of sequence . . . I would be “interrupting” myself and confusing the reader which would result in losing reader’s attention.

Here’s an aid to show flashbacks in sequence and with ease . . . print a calendar or calendars that correspond to the timeline of your story. In my above analogy of writing a letter to tell my friend what happened to me . . .  if my illness began in March 2009, I would begin with March 2009 and tell my adventure in chronology (not jumping back and forth in time).

 

If I were talking to my friend in person . . . and if I start to get mixed up regarding sequence of events . . . my friend would be able to say to me: “I’m confused.”  In writing a book, if I tell events out of sequence, the reader would not have the benefit of asking me for clarification; most likely the confused reader would put down my book.

The other major reason for showing flashbacks in sequence is to show character growth and consequences. In my above analogy . . . my reaction, decisions, action in March influence my reaction, decision, action in April . . . a calendar moves forward, not back and forth.

If my story timeline is one week . . . my reaction, decisions, action on Monday influence my reaction, decision, action on Tuesday  . . . calendar moves forward, not back and forth.

Two movies where the majority of the story is shown in one flowing flashback are Kitty Foyle (Ginger Rogers portrays protagonist) and Flawless (Demi Moore portrays protagonist) – in both stories, the beginning scene and the last scene are shown in current time; the body of the story (what happened?) is shown in one continuous flashback.

Happy Writing and Rewriting!

Sincerely,

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

 

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan  teaches writers how to transform their email signature-blocks, photos, videos, social media, website/blog descriptions into platform statements . . . to attract target audience/readers/fans . . . before and after publication.  http://WritingCoachTeresa.com and  https://www.youtube.com/user/teresaleyung

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She is the creator of:

  • classes, including:
    • *For Theme’s Sake: Edit Your Own Manuscript Before Pitching to Agents or Self-Publishing
    • *Heroes, Tricksters, and Villains – What Do These Archetypes Want in Your Story World?
  • *
  • Immigrant Experience Writing Contest
  • *
  • interactive presentations, including:
    • *Help Your Fans Find YOU
    • *Build & Retrofit Your Writer’s Platform

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the author of:

  • Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW (workbook);
  • *
  • Love Made of Heart: a Daughter, a Mother, a Journey Through Mental Illness (novel used in college classes and archived at the San Francisco History Center);
  • *
  • “Talking to My Dead Mom Monologues” (the first monologue received an award from Redwood 10-Minute Play Contest and was staged at the 6th Street Playhouse in Santa Rosa, CA);
  • *
  • her blog (which attracts tens of thousands of writers) at http://WritingCoachTeresa.com helps writers build their platforms before and after publication

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and a proud member of:

  • California Writers Club (3 branches! And a past president of the San Francisco Peninsula Branch); and a recipient of the Jack London Award for outstanding service to California Writers Club;
  • *
  • Women’s National Book Association-San Francisco Chapter (a past board member).

 

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I’m speaking as an editor/manuscript consultant. Whether you are writing fiction or narrative non-fiction, employing dialogue that not only represents each character’s personality but also gives clues  in an entertaining way will move your story forward.

How important is dialogue in a memoir or novel? Re-read your favorite story and study the author’s techniques.

When I’m not editing for my wonderful clients, I study dialogue in movies.
Since a script usually doesn’t offer narrative or internal monologue to supplement “words” the way a book does, dialogue (and how the lines are delivered) is an essential component in story-telling.  I love smart dialogue.

In the movie Woman Chases Man (1937), protagonist Virginia Travis, a starving architect (Miriam Hopkins) sees three portraits in the living room of B.J. Nolan (Charles Winninger).

Virginia:  (She sees a portrait of a little boy holding  Pilgram’s Progress)  “Who’s that?”

BJ:  “My son Kenneth.”

Virginia:  (She’s looking at the second portrait–a teenage boy holding the same book) “ Another son?”

BJ:  “Same one. Age sixteen.”

Virginia:  “Must be a slow reader.”

Virginia:   (She looks at third portrait–a young man in his cap and gown, holding diploma)  “I see he finished the book.”

BJ:  “Yeah, he has the checkbook now.”

Virginia:  “I had a checkbook once.”

The story is launched, with B. J. and Virginia scheming to get  Kenneth (Joel McCrae) to sign a check.  By the way, young Broderick Crawford’s portrayal of Hunk (friend of Virginia, disguising as B.J.’s butler) is hilarious.

Screen play by Joseph Anthony, Mannie Seff and David Hertz

Original story by Lynn Root and Frank Fenton

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In Cold Comfort Farm (1995) screenplay by Malcolm Bradbury, from the novel by Stella Gibbons (1930s), protagonist Flora Poste (recently orphaned) moves to the country to live with her relatives so that she can live on her modest 100 pounds a year and be a novelist.  Flora’s relations are odd in deed.  The mysterious matriarch, Flora’s Great Aunt Ada, doesn’t leave her room because she suffers from a terrifying memory of an event. As a girl, Ada had seen “something nasty in the wood shed” and now decades later she still has recurring nightmares.  Flora is the first person to ask Aunt Ada questions, which serves as the turning point in the story.  As it turns out, Aunt Ada doesn’t remember what she saw. But she won’t let go of her suffering (or let her family leave the farm either).

Toward the end of the story when a movie Czar Mr. Neck comes to the farm to take her grandson Seth to Hollywood . . . Great Aunt Ada comes running out of the house . . .
Great Aunt Ada : “I saw something nasty in the wood shed.”

Mr. Neck:  “Sure you did, but did they see you Baby?”

Coach Teresa here.  I emailed my friend Margaret Davis (author of Straight Down the Middle) to ask her if she has seen the movie and Margaret replied:
“My mother had a selection of novels in our house when I was growing up.  I was an avid reader, and I read, and reread, many of them over and over.  I knew Cold Comfort Farm by heart!  I also enjoyed Stella Gibbons’s book Nightingale Wood (also knew it by heart as a child!), and I know my own writing is definitely influenced by her.”

Happy New Year & New Writing Energy to Everyone!

Remember to employ dialogue that not only represents each character’s personality but also gives clues  in an entertaining way to move your story forward.

Sincerely,

Teresa LeYung Ryan

Manuscript Consultant / Writing Career Coach / Author / Publisher

http://WritingCoachTeresa.com

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