Wendy and Everyone!

I humbly thank you all for showing up to create a fun 3-hours.
You can still leave comments and tell your friends to leave comments on this post; I will ask Wendy to look for new comments in the next 4 days.

Your submitting comments today January 5th, 2013 qualified you to enter a contest. Wendy will be giving away a prize — a copy of one of her books (paperback or e-book).   On January 9, 2013 I will put your names in a pouch and ask Aster or Sid (Ambril’s guardian angels) to reach it and pull out the winner’s name.  The winner will get an email from me.

Also, you can enter Wendy’s End-of-Tour Grand Prize Giveaway of a hand-painted gnome, hand-painted by Wendy herself!  Go to  http://wendydwalter.com/blog-tour/ and scroll to bottom of that page.

To see the discussions (comments) from today, please click on the blue title-bar (header) of this post and scroll down your screen.

Thank you, Wendy, for your appearance!

Thank you, Everyone, for helping me welcome Wendy!

Please tell your friends about Wendy’s wonderful book  Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith!

Cheers!
Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan
http://writingcoachteresa.com
“Reach out, not stress out, to materialize your dearest dreams.”

Ambril's Tale,  magical garden, Derwyn

Welcome, Everyone!  Thank you for being here!  It’s fine if you’re here early  :)

Author Wendy D. Walter will be here 10:00am to 1:00pm PST to answer your questions about her wonderful book Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith, her spunky protagonist Ambril Derwyn, and her own writing life.

First, please click on the blue title-bar (header) of this post and scroll up and down your screen; you’ll see empty boxes at the bottom of this post. I’ll tell you more about how to fill in boxes later.

Wendy did the illustrations in her book.  Above is the gazebo in The Derwyn Garden.  I invite you to take a seat in the gazebo and wait for Wendy’s arrival.

Wendy says: “Ambril discovers that the garden is more of an overgrown jungle, as she wanders its rumpled paths seeking clues to her family’s mysterious heritage.”

 

   **

Wendy D. Walter uses her book Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith to:

help young adults transform grief into courage

*  inspire readers to step into their unique inherent gifts

* show teens how to overcome obstacles, including battling foul-breath monsters (and bullies in any human form), and find their way home

From 10:00am to 1:00pm PST on January 5th, 2013 you’ll be experiencing live-blog (because Wendy and I will be at our stations).

You can  participate before 10:00am or after 1:00pm PST January 5, 2013; Wendy will still answer questions if you get here after January 5th; it’s just that  you would miss out on the live-blog-experience.

How to participate (by filling in the boxes below)  . . .  If you do not see empty boxes . . . remember to click on the blue title bar/header of this post and scroll down the screen.  You submit your comments/question; I publish them so that Wendy can see them; she’ll respond by submitting comments and I publish them.  And that is how a live-blog appearance works:

In the appropriate boxes, give:

  • your full name
  • your email address [the box is labeled "Mail"] – you do need to fill in that box
  • your website/blog address if you have one [leave that box empty if you do not have a website address]
  • in the large box, you ask your question or just welcome Wendy if you do not have any questions; tell Wendy what city you’re in [perhaps you're halfway around the world from San Francisco]
  • then click on [Submit Comment] button. [If you do not press that button, it would be as if you’ve written your question for Wendy on a piece of paper but lost it . . . ]

Every few minutes between 10:00am and 1:00pm PST on January 5, 2013,  I will look for incoming comments and publish them so that everyone can see them. How fun is that!

If long minutes have gone by after you clicked on [Submit Comment] and you do not see your comment or Wendy’s response, it could be that you need to refresh your screen.  How do you refresh your screen?  Either click on the “Reload” icon on your tool bar on your screen  OR  press your F5 key  OR  press your Ctrl key and the R key at the same time.

 Ambril’s Tale, The Return of the Dullaith has received great 4-5-star reviews.

Fourteen-year-old Ambril Derwyn struggles with the mystery surrounding her father’s death when she moves back to the mysterious town where she was born. When she accidentally uncovers a secret which threatens to destroy her entire family, she continues her quest, against all odds, to clear her father’s name. But will she be able to claim her magic and heal the rifts in her family?

Ambril's Tale,  fantasy, mystery:Aster and Sid

Aster and Sid
A fat blue-eyed squirrel and an old Crow take up the daunting task of watching over Ambril and keeping the monsters at bay.

 

Your submitting comments qualifies you to enter a contest. Wendy will be giving away a prize — a copy of one of her books (paperback or e-book).   On January 9, 2013 I will put your names in a pouch and ask Aster or Sid to reach it and pull out the winner’s name.  The winner will get an email from me.

Also, you can enter Wendy’s End-of-Tour Grand Prize Giveaway of a hand-painted gnome, hand-painted by Wendy herself!  Click on http://wendydwalter.com/blog-tour/

Thank you, Wendy, for stopping by my blog!

Thank you, Everyone, for helping me welcome Wendy!

Please tell your friends about Wendy’s wonderful book.  

Where to find Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith:

http://www.amazon.com/Ambrils-Tale-Return-Dullaith-ebook/dp/B008EALE3A/

Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith at Barnes and Noble

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/174750

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan says: “Reach out, not stress out, to materialize your dearest dreams.”
http://writingcoachteresa.com


 


Bookmark and Share

51 Responses to “Please help me welcome author Wendy D. Walter to this live blog appearance”

  • Hi Teresa,
    Thanks for hosting this stop for Wendy’s blog tour. Very cool. Very kind.
    Hi, Wendy,
    Thank you for being so kind to answer questions. I wonder if you have habits or disciplines that you find helpful in your writing and illustrating. For instance, do you work at the same time each day, or purposefully mix it up? Do you prefer one time of day for creating new work and another for revising? Prefer working in silence, with music, noise? Also, is there a work habit you wish you had (or one you wish you didn’t!)?

    Christopher Wachlin (Redwood City, CA)
    The Stoneslide Corrective – A bad habit for good readers

  • Maria says:

    I will definitely check out your book, Wendy. A very timely matter, especially now when there’s cyberspace bullying, suicides and massacres with automatic weapons in schools by young people who are crying out for help. I hope your book will touch these readers and provide hope and encouragement. Thank you, Teresa, for hosting this worthwhile endeavor.

    Maria
    Elementary School Teacher

  • admin says:

    Welcome, Everyone!
    Delightful author Wendy D. Walter will be here in a few minutes.
    I see that authors Christopher Wachlin and Maria (Elementary School Teacher) have already stopped by.
    Wonderful!

    In Chapter Eleven, protagonist Ambril Derwyn and her new friend Sully are in Betula’s Shop (the girls have just escaped a run-in with bullies on bicycles). Betula serves ice cream and heavenly baked goods.

    Make yourselves comfortable. You’re safe now. Eat your favorite goodies and let’s cheer for Wendy!

    Thanks for coming!
    Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Chris!
    There is a ritual to my writing habit. I write new work in coffee shops, usually in the morning. Perhaps the burble of conversation, and that feeling of being by myself but not alone helps enable my creativity.

    But I find that I do my best editing in my closet. I have a little desk set up, it’s very quiet and feels far removed from the normal hustle of my household. I generally edit and sketch in the afternoon and evening.

    As far as work habits, I wish that I was more efficient, I rewrite loads more than I create! Sad, because I LOVE to create. Thanks for stopping by Chris!

    Wendy

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Maria, thanks for stopping by, I hope that you enjoy my book and would love to hear your honest opinion of it.

  • Tera says:

    Hi Wendy,

    I have not read your book yet, but am fascinated to hear the main character struggles with her grief and triumphs through it in order to find courage and strength to gain confidence and fight against the forces at large and small that are weakening her spirit and clouding her vision and hindering her mission, so to speak.

    I’ve not participated in one of these live discussions, so I’m not sure what to ask. Maybe you could talk about how you developed her character? What kinds of tips do you have for new writers who would like to write a book that tackles similar themes, but the writer needs to come up with their own story and own character to do it. Where does a person start exactly and what are the guidelines, if any, they should try to stay within so not to lose their focus?

  • Hi Wendy! I haven’t had a chance to read your book yet, but I hope to soon. It sounds like Ambril is a spunky, spirited female protagonist, which is refreshing to see. Were there any people or experiences in your own life that inspired you to create a character like this?

  • Hi Wendy,

    Nice to “meet” you! I want to find out more how you approached addressing bullying behavior in your book, Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith. Bullying is a topic that has been in the news and even in television shows. Yesterday, on the show “Last Man Standing” on ABC, bullying was addressed as one of the young characters was suspended from school for name-calling.

    Where did you draw from to depict the bullying behavior? And how did you weave it into the characters so that it was believable?

    In case you’re interested, here are some links about the January 4 bullying episode of Last Man Standing:

    http://www.examiner.com/article/last-man-standing-s-kaitlyn-dever-discusses-bullying

    http://www.kidzworld.com/article/27764-bullying-gets-eve-suspended-on-last-man-standing

    And the link to the show:
    http://beta.abc.go.com/shows/last-man-standing/episode-guide/episode-208-bullying

    Thanks!

    Margie
    916.213.0798

    Margie Yee Webb
    Author/Photographer, Cat Mulan’s Mindful Musings:
    Insight and Inspiration for a Wonderful Life
    http://www.catmulan.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/MargieYeeWebb

    Got Cat Stories?
    Co-Creator, Not Your Mother’s Book . . . On Cats
    ~~~Submission Deadline: May 1, 2013~~~
    http://publishingsyndicate.com/

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Tera!
    I feel that the most important thing about writing a book is to show the growth of your main character. Not to fuss about wordplay or a formula in the beginning, but to rough out a story right from the start of how your character deals with the issues that you wish to discuss.

    For me, I generally start with a simple idea, then add this, and that, and everything else to it until it’s a big, hot mess! Then I turn around and begin to streamline it. I straighten out the kinks in the plot line and work on the build until I think that I’m done…then I do it a little more!

    Ambril’s story is a series and will actually be several books long before I’ve finished, I feel that I’ve just scratched the surface of what I want to discuss at this point.

    Thanks for stopping by Tera, the best of luck to you!
    Wendy

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Dorcas!

    You asked:

    “Were there any people or experiences in your own life that inspired you to create a character like this?”

    Absolutely! My experiences moving from the easy, sunny lifestyle of Southern California to Utah in the middle of winter were what originally inspired me to write Ambril’s Tale.

    I found the restrictive culture oppressive and wondered if it was me, them or something bigger. I finally decided that, though I am a bit odd at times, that it might be something bigger, and decided to explore why a very homogenous culture, which strives for a high standard of morality, so often fails on an individual level.

    I was also bullied a little, being a new kid without the right snow boots, and felt compelled to change myself in order to fit in. I made Ambril a little spunkier than I was back then, so that she could take on the bullies and not bother to blend as much as I did.

    Thanks Dorcas!

    Wendy

  • Yolande says:

    Good Morning Wendy and Teresa! I have not read your book however I am always fascinated by anyone’s creativity, regardless of what it is. Congratulations on seeing your visions materialized and materializing. Keep up the good work and if I might add stay in constant contact with Teresa she is a fabulous mentor and a woman who will push you into your dreams!! Blessings!!

  • Tera says:

    Thanks, Wendy, for providing me a place to start with writing a book. It would be so awesome to create such a story where I deal with issues within the frame of a character and show how they grow. It sounds much more simpler than it most likely is, I’m surmising, or I’d already be doing it.

    Do you have any resources you could share with me/us, websites, tutorials or books that you could recommend to me that I could use for further guidance. I’m searching for something that can show me how to turn my ideas I get for stories into an actual book.

    Thanks again for your help and I look forward to reading your book and passing it onto my nieces and maybe even my nephews. Do you think a teen boy would enjoy your book? Why or why not?

  • LakshmiLove says:

    Hi Teresa,
    I’m here but I think I’m experiencing an operator error right here at my computer … surprise, surprise!

    I did not get to the place to sign in and I’m not experiencing the blog.

    Maybe you can help me later, honey.

    Good luck to you and Wendy with this!
    Love,
    Lakshmi

  • Dear Wendy,
    I applaud your motives to create this book. Instigating social change is always difficult. Starting at the ground floor like this will help move a whole generation into a level of sensitivity sadly lacking today. This is where change really happens. Good work!

    Thonie Hevron
    author of BY FORCE OR FEAR
    http://www.thoniehevron.com/
    Thonie’s Blog–Just the Facts, Ma’am
    Giving writers–and readers–an authentic cop experience

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Margie Yee Webb,

    Thanks for the links! How terrific that a main stream show, such as Last Man Standing, has taken on bullying.

    Bullies are rampant in our culture and always have been. As a kid, we moved around a lot, I went to 5 different elementary schools (Ambril and I have that in common). As the new kid, I ran into a lot of bullies. It appears to be a behavior that some mistake for strength, particularly the immature (of all ages).

    I believe that the only way to rid ourselves of this behavior is through discussion and education. So I decided to address bullying in my book at different levels. There are adults who bully both adults and kids, as well as the classic playground variety.

    It was great fun to tackle the bullies through Ambril, as well as a cathartic, learning exercise for myself.

    Thanks Margie for commenting, we should continue this discussion!

  • admin says:

    LakshmiLove, you are here. No operator error here.
    Thank you for showing up for author Wendy Walter.
    Thank you, Everyone!
    I’m having fun hosting. Hope you are too.
    Cheers!
    Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Yolande,

    Thanks for stopping by! Coach Teresa has helped me tremendously these past few weeks. And she’s a fine writer as well as a coach. I just finished her book, “Love Made of Heart” and reviewed it on Amazon (I highly recommended it!) Her book “Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days” is a must have for fledgling authors.

  • Wendy,
    Bullying is an important topic. I remember being tormented when I was in junior high, and trying to just ignore/survive day by day.

    I developed a self-protective mechanism where I do not overtly show when I am embarrassed. I do not blush, and if anything I become terse in my demeanor.

    Now as a mother of a teenaged son, I find it difficult to advise how he should emotionally handle when his peers treat him badly.

    Recently he wore a faux leather jacket to school. It was a hand-me-down, but still looks cool.

    His best friend told him that he shouldn’t have worn such a jacket. Because he feels my son isn’t cool enough to pull off wearing it.

    This was after the school had spent *an entire week* of special anti-bullying programs. *His best friend* had said that kind of hurtful thing to him.

    I mentioned this to my adult friends at work and they responded in a similar matter of being aghast at that behavior *and* feeling that my son can wear whatever he damn well pleases. It’s within the dress code, it fits and he likes it. If anyone doesn’t like it – then it is their problem.

    He still has not worn the jacket again to school, but he has heard the opinions of many adults on this incident and their support in his choice of jacket to wear.

  • Anne says:

    This is delightful, I’m already gleaning much. I’m trying to imagine writing in a coffee shop…the closet I understand fully.

    Yes, this subject is very timely, and as your own experiences show, it is a timeless subject. I look forward to getting a copy of your book myself as well as continuing with this informative blog/cast.

    Thank you Wendy, and Teresa for inviting me :D

  • Yolande says:

    Yes Wendy. The Build Your Writer’s Platform book made me think about who and what I am as a writer and person. It sharpened my focus and voila I am now a committed blogger, a local columnist http://www.tracypress.com/view/full_story/21306553/article-Mother-s-Corner–Reclaim-power-of-%E2%80%98no%E2%80%99?instance=home_opinion_lead_story, an author and a super duper fan of Teresa!! Great book – Love Made of Heart also. Your topic in Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith is timely and I am looking forward to reading and seeing your work. Congrats again.

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Tera!

    This is such fun, thanks for your thoughtful questions. With regard to resources to help you begin your book, I suggest that you join a local writers club or organization. I belong to the California Writers Club (CWC) and the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). Every month the CWC welcomes authors to share their experiences about writing and publishing. A couple of years ago, at a CWC meeting I joined a writers critique group, which meets monthly to review and give feedback on each others’ ongoing work. I’m also looking forward to attending the SCBWI March conference in Monterrey.

    I think if you look around your area, you might find a group or two to join that will help build you into a fine writer!

    Of course, the best thing that you can do for yourself is to sit down and write every day, if only for a few minutes. That’s the best way to write a book, make it into a habit. Before you know it, you’ll have another War and Peace – then the editing begins!

    Best wishes to you, I’d love to hear more as you progress, let’s stay in touch. Ambril’s Tale is a young YA fantasy and written for both genders. Though the protagonist is female, I worked hard to not make her girlie. And there is a great male main character called Ygg. My beta readers all chose him as their favorite character!

    Wendy

  • Hi Wendy,

    Thank you for writing this book to help young people learn resilience, hope and optimism. I look forward to reading it. I’m off now to exercise with a girlfriend, my way to stay healthy, happy and lively.

    Best of luck at building a big audience of readers.

    Deborah Taylor-French, blogging and Dog Leader Mysteries with short fiction for young readers, plus nonfiction for saving dog’s lives & dog lovers’ sanity.

  • Diane LeBow says:

    Congratulations, Wendy, for this important book and, Teresa, for this innovative process. I write travel and travel memoir and am interested how you fictionalize serious issues to make them perhaps more palatable to a larger audience. In the book I’m working on which is a travel memoir, moving across time and geography and looking at changing issues for women, I’m still trying to sharpen my angle and narrative arc. Any tips on pulling a book together that includes disparate but related tales?

    Some of my recent publications include stories in new anthologies: Travel Stories from around the World (available on Amazon and on Kindle) and Wandering in Bali (available at Book Passage)

    Good luck to all,
    Diane

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Yolande,

    I just checked out your blog and commented on your “NO” post! Kudos to you, and nicely done.

    Wendy

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Thanks for stopping by Deborah Taylor-French! I’ll be sure to look up your Dog Leader Mysteries, how intriguing.

    Wendy

  • Bardi Rosman Koodrin says:

    Hi Teresa and Wendy, I’m joining your blog party!

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Anne,

    Yes, we writers are introverts aren’t we? Writing in a closet just sounds right! But writing in a coffee shop gives one that ‘stranger in a crowd feeling’, which helps me concentrate for some odd reason, try it and see!

    Cheers to you,thanks for stopping by,

    Wendy

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Bardi!

    How nice of you to join us!

    Wendy

  • Bardi Rosman Koodrin says:

    Wendy, I have a question, and perhaps a comment mixed in there as well. I know from experience that creating an alternate world is not as easy as some people might expect. What process did you go through to create your world, and what advice can you offer other authors?

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Diane LeBow!

    You asked:
    “I’m still trying to sharpen my angle and narrative arc. Any tips on pulling a book together that includes disparate but related tales?”

    What a tall order! It’s one that a critique group member is wrestling with as well. I think your answer is in the issue you wish to address, “looking at changing issues for women”. I assume this means how women deal with their changing roles in society today?!

    The trick is to let this issue imbue every component of your story. If you are jumping around the world as well as your timeline, it’s important that you maintain your focus and use this issue to not only promote your thoughts about it but also to structure your narrative.

    I hope this helps, good luck to you!

    Wendy

  • LakshmiLove says:

    Teresa LeYung-Ryan is one of the kindest, most loving, most generous women I know. I am so blessed to have her in my life. She is a gift for all of us to treasure!

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Thonie Hevron,

    Thanks for taking the time to come by and comment. I checked out your blog, your book looks quite interesting, kudos on your award!

    Cheers to you,

    Wendy

  • admin says:

    Everyone! Thank you for joining us!

    Wendy, a few guests have quietly appeared some time ago. Could you scroll through all the comments and respond to them too? Thank you so much for being here and enlightening us with the themes in your book.

    I’m publishing new comments as they come in; gosh this is fun.

    Thank you, Wendy and Everyone!

    Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan,
    Host of this event with fabulous author Wendy Walter

  • Kate Farrell says:

    Congratulations, Wendy! And kudos to Teresa for sponsoring this live blog chat!

    I’m a middle school librarian in San Francisco. It looks like Ambril’s Tale would appeal to middle school students who deal with bullying on a daily basis and who also love fantasy. Sometimes it’s much easier to understand emotional issues like grief and bullying in a fantasy than in a realistic fiction.

    Do you agree? Or was it just your own preference?

  • Thanks Wendy! I agree with your statements: “It appears to be a behavior that some mistake for strength, particularly the immature (of all ages).” and “I believe that the only way to rid ourselves of this behavior is through discussion and education.”

    And to Linda McCabe, sorry to hear about your son being treated badly and his feelings hurt, especially after the school just had special anti-bullying programs.

    I have seen bullying behavior in various forms, including in writing via e-mails, and know of others who have too. Sometimes the remarks may be in the guise of sarcasm. All of this demonstrates that the topic of bullying needs to be dealt with regularly. I think this type of behavior continues because the culprit is not confronted. It is hurtful, rude and disrespectful. Unfortunately, when a culprit is “called out,” the behavior may get worst.

    Yes, we should continue the discussion.

    Thanks!

    Margie
    916.213.0798

    Margie Yee Webb
    Author/Photographer, Cat Mulan’s Mindful Musings:
    Insight and Inspiration for a Wonderful Life
    http://www.catmulan.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/MargieYeeWebb

    Got Cat Stories?
    Co-Creator, Not Your Mother’s Book . . . On Cats
    ~~~Submission Deadline: May 1, 2013~~~
    http://publishingsyndicate.com/

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Linda C. McCabe,

    Thank you for sharing your own and your son’s experiences with bullying. Sadly, I think that most of us have endured the hurtful censor of our friends as your son did.

    I’m encouraged by the fact that our society is beginning to address this issue more and more, but in my heart of hearts, I feel bullying is part of our monkey-ness and wonder if we will ever be able to truly rise above it.

    It’s something that I believe we must learn to deal with more effectively. The best approach appears to be ongoing education in my mind as well as monitoring the behavior of those most vulnerable, our children. There is so much to explore and learn in this world, it’s much harder to do if one feels cowed by another individual.

    Wendy

  • Jean Morrow says:

    Hi Teresa, Wendy! Hope I’m not too late for the session. Wendy, I’m awed by your imaginative and unique characters — Rosebud the bicycle, the aunties with their knitting, the 3-headed dog, etc. Care to discuss how you come up with such fanciful characters?

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Kate,

    You asked:
    “Sometimes it’s much easier to understand emotional issues like grief and bullying in a fantasy than in a realistic fiction.

    Do you agree? Or was it just your own preference?”

    I absolutely agree! Thank you for bringing this up. I’m not sure why this is, but if you take a simple bullying exchange off the playground in our world and give the characters fangs and fairy wings, the issue becomes much clearer.

    In fantasy, we get a bit heavy handed at times and tend to make our bullies actual monsters (it’s more fun that way). Also, as bullying is an obvious abuse of power, it works well within worlds where it’s clear who the good and bad guys are, at least most of the time! Check out the Q&A Teresa posted on this blog for more on bullying:

    http://lovemadeofheart.com/blog/coach-teresas-interview-questions-for-author-wendy-d-walter-ambrils-tale-the-return-of-the-dullaith/

    Ambril’s Tale is for the 10-14 marketplace, just right for middle schoolers! Thanks for stopping by, if you would like me to donate a copy of Ambril’s Tale to your school, please let me know, I’d be happy to.

    Cheers,

    Wendy

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Jean!

    Thanks for coming by, Some of my characters are right out of my imagination, but some of them have roots in mythology.

    The Aunties, for instance, are the seers of the story, who share one pair of glasses. Perseus runs into three crones who share one eye and a tooth in one of his adventures, but groupings of three witches/hags/seers appear in all sorts of ancient Nordic and Germanic stories as well!

    The Cerberus, the guardians of the underworld, is one of my favorite Greek legends. Who wouldn’t love to play fetch with the Hounds of Hell? Well at least in a story!

    I find that giving some of my characters a fairy tale pedigree gives the story greater depth.

    Cheers,

    Wendy

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi LakshmiLove,

    Thank you for coming by, this is great fun isn’t it?

    Wendy

  • Janine says:

    Wendy,
    I just browsed thru your website and read the excerpt of Ambril’s Tale. I had never heard of your book until Teresa sent me an email about today’s event. I like everything I have seen. Your writing is a great example of what my 12 year old son can see as an example of what I call “paint the picture” writing. Thank you! He also likes fantasy world themes so I am going to get it for him. I also want to read it because I have a daughter who was bullied in high school.

  • Thanks Coach Teresa for hosting a LIVE BLOG TOUR! Thanks Wendy for sharing your insights and experiences!

    I enjoyed participating in this live event. Thanks again!

    Margie Yee Webb
    Author/Photographer, Cat Mulan’s Mindful Musings:
    Insight and Inspiration for a Wonderful Life
    http://www.catmulan.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/MargieYeeWebb

    Got Cat Stories?
    Co-Creator, Not Your Mother’s Book . . . On Cats
    ~~~Submission Deadline: May 1, 2013~~~
    http://publishingsyndicate.com/

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Bardi!

    Great question: “I know from experience that creating an alternate world is not as easy as some people might expect. What process did you go through to create your world, and what advice can you offer other authors?”

    Creating alternative worlds is great fun for me, it allows me to flex the creative, visualizing side of me that I used so often when I practiced Interior Architecture. It was the best part of that job.

    The key to developing vivid, realistic worlds is to spend a lot of time there yourself. Day dreaming is a must for every fantasy writer, actually any writer. You have to spend enough time there to allow your characters to wake up. When that happens, they will fill you in on the details of your world.

    It’s a marvelous when you establish that level of connection! For me it was the moment I realized that I would actually finish Ambril’s story. That I truly had become a writer.

    Thanks again Bardi!

    Wendy

  • admin says:

    Wendy and Everyone!

    I humbly thank you all for showing up to create a fun 3-hours.
    You can still leave comments and tell your friends to leave comments on this post; I will ask Wendy to look for new comments in the next 4 days.

    Your submitting comments qualifies you to enter a contest. Wendy will be giving away a prize — a copy of one of her books (paperback or e-book). On January 9, 2013 I will put your names in a pouch and ask Aster or Sid (Ambril’s guardian angels) to reach it and pull out the winner’s name. The winner will get an email from me.

    Also, you can enter Wendy’s End-of-Tour Grand Prize Giveaway of a hand-painted gnome, hand-painted by Wendy herself! Go to http://wendydwalter.com/blog-tour/ and scroll to bottom of that page.

    Thank you, Wendy, for your appearance!

    Thank you, Everyone, for helping me welcome Wendy!

    Please tell your friends about Wendy’s wonderful book Ambril’s Tale, Return of the Dullaith!

    Cheers!
    Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan
    http://writingcoachteresa.com
    “Reach out, not stress out, to materialize your dearest dreams.”

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Janine,

    That’s wonderful! I hope your kids enjoy the story, Book 2 of Ambril’s Tale, “Riding the Cursed Shoots”, is coming out in March.

    Cheers,

    Wendy

  • Anne says:

    Thank you Theresa and Wendy for doing this and including me–way kewl. I hope I can review the comments later too. And hopefully I can participate in more.

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Thanks everyone for coming, this was such great fun for me!

    A special thanks to Teresa LeYung Ryan for arranging this, and being so supportive of my book, Ambril’s Tale

    Happy Reading!

    Wendy

  • Eugenia Budman says:

    Hi Wendy,
    Congratulations on your book! I can imagine how thrilling it is to complete, publish and have it finallyin your hands, your “baby”, your wonderful book. What an accomplishment!
    I am a bit late to the party — Saturdays are many-other-chores-that don’t fit the weekdays days. But here is my question: who are your favorite writers and what did you learn from them.
    warm regards ,
    Eugenia

  • Wendy Walter says:

    Hi Eugenia!
    I’m so glad you made it and thank you for your kind wishes.

    You asked:
    “Who are your favorite writers and what did you learn from them?”

    Great question! My all time favorite writer is Jane Austen. It’s been over 200 years since she was first published and her stories still enthrall me. From her books, I learned that the most important thing a writer can do is to make your readers care about what happens to your character and to never underestimate your reader.

    I’m also a great admirer of Diana Wynne Jones, my favorite fantasy writer. She also never underestimated her readers and gave us incredibly intricate and original stories. Her books are often funny as well!

    And that is why Ambril’s Tail has a very robust plot, with lots of twists and turns and strives to be humorous as often as possible!

    Thanks for stopping by, enjoy your weekend!

    Wendy

  • Eve Visconti says:

    Hi, Wendy: This is really cool! I’m so happy for you, and hope the book is selling like hotcakes. What I love about your book is the camp humor infused throughout. I’m just wondering how the YA readers respond to the little “inside jokes” – obviously so “Bay Area” sophisticated. Do they “get” them, or are the intended for the adult reader?

Leave a Reply

Subscribe to my blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives