Posts Tagged ‘plotting a writer’s platform’

Coach Teresa, did you write an article about plotting a writer’s platform for Plot Teacher Martha Alderson?

Martha Alderson, plot teacher, published my article especially written for her: http://www.blockbusterplots.com/resc/teresa.html

Here’s Martha’s introduction:

Teresa LeYung Ryan

I met Teresa more than twelve years ago, before either of us were published. When Teresa’s book, Love Made of Heart, a story about a daughter’s journey to self-forgiveness, was published by Kensington Publishing NY, she gave me credit for teaching her about the difference between front-story and back-story. As she promoted her book, she generously continued to give me credit and, in so doing, helped launch my plot teaching career. I’ve been grateful for her help ever since.

Now, Teresa has crafted a book for writers interested in building a platform for themselves. Early in our careers, the need for a fiction writer to have a “platform” was not great. Today, it’s imperative for all writers to establish a platform for themselves. In her new book, Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase in 22 Days Teresa gives easy to follow steps. I asked her to share some of her thoughts and ideas on building a writer’s platform.

Know Where Your Protagonist Is Going, Plot Your Story; Know Where Your Career is Heading, Plot Your Platform

From Plot Master Martha Alderson you have learned how to plot your story. Now, you might be asking “What is a platform?” and “Why do I need to plot one?”

On page 1 of my workbook Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days, the definition of platform: “Making your name stand for something—to attract targeted consumers who are likely to buy what you have to sell.”

Celebrity authors and best-selling authors have platforms. Authors who want to attract agents and publishers need platforms; authors who want to be their own publishers need them too.

Martha says: “Plot is what happens to the protagonist because of the dramatic action . . . . when the dramatic action changes him/her at depth over time, the story becomes thematically significant.”

The operative words are “at depth” and “over time.”

Just as your protagonist is transformed, so can your platform.

Years ago, when my publisher (who had found me through my agent) offered me a contract, I had 18 months to “think about my platform” (it would take 18 months for my book to go through the channels– from the day I sign the contract to the day when my book would be in bookstores—18 luxurious months to make my name stand for something).

Today, most authors will never experience that luxury. Why? Because even when an author lands an agent, the author’s manuscript or book proposal is often rejected by publishers if the author cannot show that he/she has a fanbase/platform.

You might be saying “I don’t need publishers. I’m going to self-publish.”

I say “Wonderful! Whether you want to sell rights to a publisher or be your own publisher, “invest” in yourself. Grow your fanbase now. Plot your platform. Know where your career is heading the way you know where your protagonist is going. And please… reach out, not stress out.

3 Tips to Get Started–Make Your Name Audible, Visible, Memorable:

1) When you introduce yourself at parties, meetings, conferences . . . enunciate your full name; the person you’re chatting with could be a future fan
Show your full name on name badges and sign-in sheets. If you have a pen name, and you want people to remember you by that name, use your pseudonym. Your phone’s outgoing message—announce your full name.
2) What does your name look like in your email address? Is it something obscure like “cba94111” cba94111@gmail.com ? You’re professional, make your email address professional. Here are mine: “Teresa LeYung Ryan” WritingCoachTeresa@gmail.com (as a writing career coach); “Teresa LeYung Ryan” Teresa@LoveMadeOfHeart.com (as author of the novel Love Made of Heart)
3) What does your signature block look like? Show your full name. Also, if you like adding quotes in your signature block . . . instead of quoting other people, quote yourself. Show email recipients (even family members and friend) something memorable.
Examples:

Sincerely,
Teresa LeYung Ryan, author/writing career coach
http://WritingCoachTeresa.com
“I use my workbook to help writers gain a competitive edge. A platform is not something you stand on. It’s something you stand for!”

Sincerely,
Teresa LeYung Ryan,
http://LoveMadeOfHeart.com
“I use my novel Love Made of Heart to inspire adult-children of mentally-ill parents to speak openly about the stigmas and to gain resources for their families.”

Thank you, Writing Coach Teresa!

This is a sample of the ideas Teresa has to share with you in her new book, on her blog, and on her website. She, along with Elisa Southard — author of Break Through the Noise, has presented every year at the San Francisco Writers Conference to prepare writers for their pitch sessions with agents and publishers. She has helpful information for writers serious about their writing careers.

Thank you so much, Plot Teacher Martha!

If you’d like to read Martha’s interview of me as a novelist, go here: http://blockbusterplots.com/resc/ryan.html

Did you know that you can pre-order Martha’s new book via Amazon? (will be shipped October 2011 or sooner) The Plot Whisperer: Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master

 

Cheers to fiction and nonfiction writers!

Happy platform & fanbase building!

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

Click on book cover to go to Amazon

Subscribe to my blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives