Posts Tagged ‘editor’

Coach Teresa Advises Reading While Rewriting

Dear Writers,

Are you stressed out while rewriting your project?  Breathe. Drink water. Exercise.  And read, read, read.

Whatever genre you’re writing, give your characters new sparks by rereading your favorite book of the same genre.

Study how the author of that favorite book show:

  • what the protagonist wants (early in the story)–to connect with Reader
  • the authentic details in the setting, circumstances, vernacular
  • sensory details
  • dialogue and body language that reveals each character’s personality or what he/she wants to show
  • hooks, foreshadowing, metaphors
  • archetypes help move story forward
  • thematic threads

I’m cheering for you!

Sincerely,
Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

http://writingcoachteresa.com

Teresa LeYung-Ryan has helped over 1,000 writers.

As editor/story consultant, Coach Teresa helps her clients polish their manuscripts by identifying the themes and archetypes in their stories.

Her novel Love Made of Heart is used in college composition classes.

As author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW, she coaches authors before and after publication. 

http://writingcoachteresa.com Read other posts in her blog.

 

In The Apartment (script by Billy Wilder and  I.A.L. Diamond ), the 2 protagonists are C.C. Baxter, an insurance clerk (whose apartment is much in demand by four executives for their extramarital activities) and Miss Kubelik, an elevator operator in the insurance company (who is described by Baxter as a “perfectly respectable girl”).

Then there’s Miss Olsen. She is secretary to Jeff Sheldrake who is head of Personnel. Miss Olsen appears in only a few scenes, yet, she personifies multiple archetypes—shape-shifter; herald, but also threshold guardian; antagonist, but also ally. Her character fascinates me. Baxter’s and Kubelik’s heroes’ journeys would not have begun if not for the action of this not-so-minor character.

For more information about the movie http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053604/

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C.C. Baxter -  portrayed by Jack Lemmon

Miss Kubelik – Shirley MacLaine

Jeff Sheldrake – Fred MacMurray

Dr. Dreyfuss-  Jack Kruschen

Miss Olsen – Edie Adams

 

 

 

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May your major and not-so-minor characters be memorable!

I recommend your studying The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers by Christopher Vogler and The Plot Whisperer: Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master by Martha Alderson.

Happy writing and rewriting!

Editor / Manuscript Consultant / Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

http://writingcoachTeresa.com

Teresa is author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW

Teresa is author of Love Made of Heart

Coach Teresa edits manuscripts (contemporary novels; thrillers; children’s novels; memoirs) for authors who want to attract agents  & publishers  OR  want to be their own publishers.

 

Exactly the right words; social networking; taglines; job seekers; grammar; manuscripts; Chinese word for heart

I started a new format for my blog posts on November 16, 2011. Once a month, I will write a post to include 3 sections.

As 22-day Platform-Building Coach Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days:

Write Your Story Now! PLAYshop with Mary E. Knippel

Are you frustrated trying to find just exactly the right words
- for your blog posts?
-for that end-of-the-year letter to family or customers?
-to update your profile on your website or social media site?

Come and explore how you can overcome your writing challenges and have fun at the same time!

Nov. 19, 2011   9 a.m. -4 p.m. Free Event
$20 holds your seat (refunded at the door)
Workshop in Half Moon Bay, CA

Click here for more details.

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Mary Tang tells me that George Kao teaches people/small businesses how to gain visibility and find customers via social networking http://www.georgekao.net/
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Learn how to craft your talking-tagline from Guru Elisa Sasa Southard http://breakthroughthenoise.com/ Get Elisa’s book!
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Job Seekers check out http://dearjane.info/
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As Editor & Manuscript Consultantidentify themes and archetypes:

Get yourself a book on grammar. I recommend Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe’s Guide to Better English in Plain English by Patricia T. O’Conner

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Teresa LeYung-Ryan & Mary E. Knippel show writers how to polish their manuscripts before:

  • hiring book doctor/developmental editor
  • pitching to agents or acquisition editors
  • self-publishing

As author of Love Made of Heart:

November is:

“Reach out, not stress out, when pursuing your dreams!”

Please click here for details to Coach Teresa’s event.

Sincerely,

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

Manuscript Consultant/Editor/Coach Teresa Loves to See the Words in Movies/Films

Coach Teresa here…  I love to study the dialogue in movies.  Oftentimes I turn on “English subtitles” so that I can “see” the words.   Such a simple technique to help me be a better editor for my clients and a better writer of my own stories.

Two of my favorite movies?   Bagdad Cafe aka Out of Rosenheim (written and produced by Eleonore and Percy Adlon; screenplay co-writer Christopher Doherty; stars: Marianne Sägebrecht, CCH Pounder and Jack Palance) and The Apartment (written by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond; stars: Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray, Jack Kruschen, Edie Adams)

Listen and look for metaphors, foreshadowing, and thematic significance in the dialogue.

Of course the acting, directing, music, set design, costumes, filming, editing are superb too in both movies.

In Bagdad Cafe “Calling You” sung by Jevetta Steele (words and music by Bob Telson) is beautifully haunting.

In The Apartment, even the theme-tunes for the major characters follow plot points.

I’ll be blogging more about themes and archetypes in these two movies.

I love helping writers identify themes and archetypes in their manuscripts and make their names synonymous with the subject matters/issues they write about to a attract agents, editors, publishers, readers, and media attention before and after publication. Reach out, not stress out, when pursuing your dreams!

Happy writing!

Sincerely,

Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan

Please visit my website http://writingcoachteresa.com

If you wish to email me, I’m writingcoachTeresa at gmail.com

Author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW (print edition $12.96  & eBook edition $9.81)

and the novel Love Made of Heart (inspires adult children of mentally ill parents to speak openly about the stigmas and find resources for their families)

I’m so happy for the contributing authors in Fault Zone: Words from the Edge (the California Writers Club-San Francisco Peninsula branch’s anthology). Available at Kepler’s Books & Magazines.

Ann Foster

Bardi Rosman Koodrin

Carole Bumpus

Cheryl S. Levinson

Christopher Wachlin

Darlene Frank

David Hirzel

Diane Moomey

Elise Frances Miller

Eve Visconti

Ida Lewenstein

James Hanna

Jo Carpignano

Laurel Anne Hill

Linda Newman

Lisa Meltzer Penn (also editor)

Lucy Ann Murray

Margaret Davis

Martha Clark Scala

Mil Pribble

Ollie Mae Trost Welch

Tia Creighton

Tory Hartmann

“For writers who want to study the craft and for readers who love engaging stories and poems, the anthology Fault Zone: Words from the Edge fits the bill. How to entertain with humor, suspense, poignancy? All here. Bravissimo, California Writers Club authors and editors!”  Teresa LeYung-Ryan, author, manuscript consultant, writing career coach

Teresa is author of Love Made of Heart

Teresa is author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW

 

I’m speaking as an editor/manuscript consultant. Whether you are writing fiction or narrative non-fiction, employing dialogue that not only represents each character’s personality but also gives clues  in an entertaining way will move your story forward.

How important is dialogue in a memoir or novel? Re-read your favorite story and study the author’s techniques.

When I’m not editing for my wonderful clients, I study dialogue in movies.
Since a script usually doesn’t offer narrative or internal monologue to supplement “words” the way a book does, dialogue (and how the lines are delivered) is an essential component in story-telling.  I love smart dialogue.

In the movie Woman Chases Man (1937), protagonist Virginia Travis, a starving architect (Miriam Hopkins) sees three portraits in the living room of B.J. Nolan (Charles Winninger).

Virginia:  (She sees a portrait of a little boy holding  Pilgram’s Progress)  “Who’s that?”

BJ:  “My son Kenneth.”

Virginia:  (She’s looking at the second portrait–a teenage boy holding the same book) “ Another son?”

BJ:  “Same one. Age sixteen.”

Virginia:  “Must be a slow reader.”

Virginia:   (She looks at third portrait–a young man in his cap and gown, holding diploma)  “I see he finished the book.”

BJ:  “Yeah, he has the checkbook now.”

Virginia:  “I had a checkbook once.”

The story is launched, with B. J. and Virginia scheming to get  Kenneth (Joel McCrae) to sign a check.  By the way, young Broderick Crawford’s portrayal of Hunk (friend of Virginia, disguising as B.J.’s butler) is hilarious.

Screen play by Joseph Anthony, Mannie Seff and David Hertz

Original story by Lynn Root and Frank Fenton

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

In Cold Comfort Farm (1995) screenplay by Malcolm Bradbury, from the novel by Stella Gibbons (1930s), protagonist Flora Poste (recently orphaned) moves to the country to live with her relatives so that she can live on her modest 100 pounds a year and be a novelist.  Flora’s relations are odd in deed.  The mysterious matriarch, Flora’s Great Aunt Ada, doesn’t leave her room because she suffers from a terrifying memory of an event. As a girl, Ada had seen “something nasty in the wood shed” and now decades later she still has recurring nightmares.  Flora is the first person to ask Aunt Ada questions, which serves as the turning point in the story.  As it turns out, Aunt Ada doesn’t remember what she saw. But she won’t let go of her suffering (or let her family leave the farm either).

Toward the end of the story when a movie Czar Mr. Neck comes to the farm to take her grandson Seth to Hollywood . . . Great Aunt Ada comes running out of the house . . .
Great Aunt Ada : “I saw something nasty in the wood shed.”

Mr. Neck:  “Sure you did, but did they see you Baby?”

Coach Teresa here.  I emailed my friend Margaret Davis (author of Straight Down the Middle) to ask her if she has seen the movie and Margaret replied:
“My mother had a selection of novels in our house when I was growing up.  I was an avid reader, and I read, and reread, many of them over and over.  I knew Cold Comfort Farm by heart!  I also enjoyed Stella Gibbons’s book Nightingale Wood (also knew it by heart as a child!), and I know my own writing is definitely influenced by her.”

Happy New Year & New Writing Energy to Everyone!

Remember to employ dialogue that not only represents each character’s personality but also gives clues  in an entertaining way to move your story forward.

Sincerely,

Teresa LeYung Ryan

Manuscript Consultant / Writing Career Coach / Author / Publisher

http://WritingCoachTeresa.com

Teresa LeYung Ryan
http://www.WritingCoachTeresa.com

Career Coach for Writers

and

Manuscript Consultant

  • polish your manuscript by identifying the themes and archetypes;
  • market yourself to agents and publishers;
  • map out your career.

Teresa edits women’s fiction, mainstream fiction, memoirs, children’s and young adults’ fiction, and short stories.

Some comments from her clients:

Teresa is not only a lovely writer and a wonderful person, but also an enthusiastic, inspiring, and thorough mentor. Her far-reaching knowledge, networking expertise, and organization ensure that an aspiring writer will have the strongest foundation possible to launch him/herself on a successful career.Pat Windom

Teresa, . . because of you, the story has grown. You make me dig deeper and it brings more life to the story. E. Hartshorn

Teresa, . . . I even see myself succeeding and being put into print and making money with my writing ability. I am so grateful to you. D.Warner


Teresa LeYung Ryan is:

  • Member-at-Large at Women’s National Book Association-SF Chapter;
  • Past Co-Chair of Group Mentoring at California Writers Club-San Francisco Peninsula Branch;
  • Past President of California Writers Club-San Francisco Peninsula Branch;
  • a 2004 recipient of the Jack London Award for her services to California Writers Club;
  • Speaker and instructor.

Teresa LeYung Ryan uses her mother-daughter novel Love Made of Heart to advocate compassion for mental illness and to help survivors of family violence find their own voices.

In Love Made of Heart, protagonist Ruby Lin is forced to look into her past when her mother shuts down her own painful world. The story explores the complex bonds between mothers and daughters, the choices we make when our hearts are broken, and the choices we make when our hearts are healed.

  • archived at the San Francisco History Center;
  • recommended by the California School Library Association;
  • recommended by the California Reading Association;
  • used in Advanced Composition English-as-a-Second-Language classes.

www.LoveMadeOfHeart.com

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