Posts Tagged ‘compassion’

2021 March 14, 21:38; March 15, 14:47; March 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27; amended 2021 March 27, 07:44

Teresa Jade LeYung’s Blog Post #604

Last week, I was at a place not far from where I live -  to escape from construction noise (neighbors modifying their house to “age in place”).  While I am happy for anyone who can do that … the persistent noise produced by power tools and hammers reactivated my persistent pain pathways in such a way that I don’t have words to describe the sensations. For sure they are “unpleasant” and “undesirable”.

On March 10, at this place of tranquility, I woke up to the sound of power pruning.  NO!  I thought Am I being tested?

On March 11, another unpleasant incident occupied my thoughts.

On March 12, I read the email from kindhearted mentor author Margaret R. Davis.  Margaret asked: “Teresa, can’t you apply the very same principles you use to reduce pain to block out the irritation of the construction noise?”

Margaret is referring to what I have learned and what I continue to learn from Dr. Norman Doidge, Dr. Michael Moskowitz, Dr. Marla Golden, Dr. Danielle Rosenman, Professor Lorimer Moseley about retraining my brain / practicing neuroplasticity.

Thank you, Margaret! Thank you to ALL the dear hearts in my life who care about my well-being.  I am most grateful!

Soothing thoughts. I thought about LaH who delivered me to this lovely place and how MT, SS, NN individually visited me and brought delicious foods, and, everyone who sent cards, emails, text-messages, voicemail, thoughts, prayers.

On the evening of  March 13,  2021, I wanted to watch the movie PRIVATE BENJAMIN (starring Goldie Hawn) again.

Well, not only did I find clips on YouTube, but also, I was rewarded with https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZsGZZA3LNM  Ms. Goldie Hawn’s inspiring presentation  “Importance of Mindfulness” 

I was overjoyed listening to Ms. Goldie Hawn’s sharing stories of children learning about how their brains work, and talking about their amygdala, prefrontal cortex … what is neuroplasticity, practicing “Brain Breaks” (meditation) with their teachers three times a day in school, using soothing thoughts to quiet their hardworking brains, and, the children going home to share their knowledge with their parents and other family members.
At 19 minutes Ms. Hawn shows the audience a film on MindUP – the signature program for children of the Goldie Hawn Foundation.
At 39 minutes  Ms. Hawn talks about intentions; to witness thoughts, and not get attached to them.

[ Teresa Jade LeYung here…

“Wow, witness my thoughts but not get attached to them. I thought about my lineage….  If as children my grandparents on both sides were given the opportunities to practice this skill, then, as adults they would have passed it onto their children (my parents), and my parents would have passed it onto me and my siblings.

“My parents were young people during World War II; my mother was orphaned; my father had to leave home to find work and send money to support his mother and siblings; then, they experienced colonization . . . such chaotic lives . . . and no one to teach them how to create peace for their beautiful brains.

“Last week, while I was at that lovely place that turned out to be not so tranquil, I said to my pals ‘I am what I think.’  If I am to truly heal from persistent pain and unpleasant sensations (all produced by Beautiful Brain), I must practice detaching myself from worrisome thoughts, and, use soothing thoughts to create pleasant sensations.” ]

 * * * * * * *

 

 

https://mindup.org/  says:  “Since 2003, MindUP has been helping children develop the mental fitness necessary to thrive in school and throughout their lives.

MindUP is the signature program of The Goldie Hawn Foundation, a not-for-profit organization created in response to the global epidemic of childhood aggression, anxiety, depression and suicide. Based firmly in neuroscience, MindUP gives children the knowledge and tools they need to manage stress, regulate emotions and face the challenges of the 21st century with optimism, resilience and compassion.”

* * * * * * *

Above graphics of the brain is from TRANSFORMING THE BRAIN IN PAIN: NEUROPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION workbook

by Michael H. Moskowitz, MD & Marla D. Golden, DO

http://www.neuroplastix.com 

https://shop.neuroplastix.com/Neuroplastic-Transformation-Workbook-92-W8PZ-LIIY.htm


 [ Teresa Jade LeYung here…

“I wonder if Dr. Moskowitz, Dr. Golden or Dr. Danielle Rosenman know about Ms. Hawn’s foundation and that the children in the MindUP program know what their Amygdala, Prefrontal Cortex and other parts of their brains do and how they (the children) learn to develop mental fitness.

“In our family, no one taught us anything resembling mental fitness.

“The adults were inept. In the 1970s, my escape was watching movies from the 1940′s, but, many of the characters in those films were lost souls. Our brother turned to music. Our little sister relied on her imagination; her stuffed animal companion Happy Dog was her loyal and gentle confidant.

“As an adult, my sister always chose careers that involved helping children.  She is Maria Kawah Leung – author of LITTLE HEROES OF BAY STREET: And How They Stay Strong in an Unhappy Home.  The protagonists in her illustrated book are Mia and Happy Dog.   To hear a reading of Maria Kawah Leung’s book by Hannah Yeoh, a member of Parliament in Malaysia, and to hear Happy Dog’s message to children, and Maria’s comforting words to children and adults … watch on Youtube  https://youtu.be/9k8DLcJlvVg


 

“If MindUP had existed during our childhood . . . I can just see my little sister coming home to show our parents how to “quiet their hardworking brains” ]

* * * * * * *

 

 https://mindup.org/

The heroes at MindUP announce:  “We are happy to announce MindUP will now be rebranded to MindUP For Life.  Evolving the visual identity to embody its new holistic direction.
We are thrilled to unveil our new brand identity and share with you that MindUP is evolving to become MindUP for Life. After many years as a school-based program for educators, MindUP for Life will now also be available to parents, families, and adults. This rebranding marks an exciting time in MindUP’s history, as we are launching the 2nd edition of our curriculum as well as an interactive online platform projected to launch this spring to support our growing audience. Over the last few months, we have worked with the amazing team at Le Parc Design to create a new image that would accurately depict our growth and helps us impact as many individuals as possible.
To foster children’s well-being through educational programs based in neuroscience and mindful practice.
Based firmly in neuroscience, MindUP teaches the skills and knowledge children need to regulate their stress and emotion, form positive relationships, and act with kindness and compassion.”
Ms. Goldie Hawn explains how brain breaks and meditation have a positive effect on our neurobiology https://mindup.org/category/mindup-at-home/

 * * * * * * *

Dear Readers,

Thank you for reading this blog post:  Author and Theme Consultant Teresa Jade LeYung says: “Everywhere I go, I learn about our beautiful brains. This week, MindUP, Ms. Goldie Hawn’s foundation”

I wish you and your beautiful brains – safety, kindness, excellent health, clear water, blue sky, delicious eats, smiles, sweet laughter, soothing thoughts and more soothing thoughts!

Sincerely,

photo of Teresa Jade LeYung by Sasa Southard, world adventurer

 

Teresa Jade LeYung

Theme Consultant / Platform-Building Coach

Coach Teresa Jade LeYung says: “I love helping writers identify the themes in their manuscripts to hook readers, and, build and fortify their platforms before and after publication.  Reach out, not stress out.”
www.TeresaJadeLeYung.com

Coach Teresa’s workbook -
Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW  — print edition and ebook

author Teresa Jade LeYung (mask and photo by Emily)

 

 

 

 

http://www.OurBeautifulBrains.com   takes you to Story Continuity / Theme Consultant Teresa Jade LeYung’s blog - resources regarding our beautiful  brains  / persistent pain / depression  / wellness

Love Made Of Heart ®

Teresa Jade LeYung says “Be kind to our beautiful brains.”

 

Writing Career Coach Teresa LeYung-Ryan Loves Stories About Words

Tuesday night, my sister and I dined at Squat & Gobble Cafe & Crepery before going to my gig with fellow Women’s National Book Association member Birgit Soyka at BookShop West Portal.

At first I thought the eatery was called Squab & Gobble, but, the name is Squat & Gobble. Why “Squat” ?  Chickens squat. People squat.  Squatting is done with the lower half of our body. Why “Gobble” ? Gobbling is done with our mouths.

What’s the lore behind the phrase squat and gobble?

Here’s a story about the Chinese word for “heart”:   The word “heart” is inside the words “grace,” “forgiveness,” “perseverance,” “compassion.” The word “heart” is inside the word “love” thus love made of heart.

What was our gig? http://lovemadeofheart.com/blog/how-do-authors-teresa-leyung-ryan-and-birgit-soyka-celebrate-rebuild-your-life-month-in-june/

Sincerely,

Teresa LeYung-Ryan

Manuscript Consultant

author of Love Made of Heart

Writing Career Coach

author of Build Your Writer’s Platform & Fanbase In 22 Days: Attract Agents, Editors, Publishers, Readers, and Media Attention NOW

 

While looking for examples to show my clients how to find transcripts archived on websites, I came upon:

http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/05252007/profile.html

Veterans Of War, Veterans Of Peace

Thank you, Mr. Bill Moyers, and everyone at The Journal and PBS for interviewing Ms. Maxine Hong Kingston on May 25, 2007 and making the transcript and video available on that site. Thanks for reading excerpts from Veterans of War, Veterans of Peace with Maxine. Each story/poem written by the veteran or loved one of a veteran carried much compassion.  The book–what a magnificent gift from Maxine and the courageous men and women who transformed their suffering into what I call “word energy.”

The interview and the excerpts got me thinking about my mom who was an orphan in China during WWII. She never talked about her experiences; at times a word would slip out, but, she would stop herself. She died in 2000 and I would like to believe that she’s watching over me, encouraging me to write for people who cannot speak for themselves.

Maxine had inspired me to write my first book when in 1990 I read Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts. http://www.redroom.com/author/maxine-hong-kingston has other videos on Maxine and her work. Thanks again for the May 25, 2007 program.

Sincerely,
Teresa LeYung Ryan, author, writing-career coach
http://LoveMadeOfHeart.com
http://writingcoachteresa.wordpress.com/

Writing colleague Pamela Reitman had emailed me the invitation to this half-day symposium. The words on the flyer hooked me. “Building a Caring Community for Mental Illness,” “open to everyone,” “this conference is FREE,” and “light refreshments will be provided.”
And, I didn’t have to be Jewish to attend this event at Congregation Beth Sholom in San Francisco August 30, 2009 Noon-5:30pm.  “Open to everyone” said the invitation.  I would go with my mom watching over me.
In my first novel Love Made of Heart, I had fictionalized my mother’s story, her battling with mental illness, my role as a witness to her suffering. Whenever I give talks on the book, I make the statement: “I advocate compassion for mental illness.”  The conference would give me an

Pam Reitman greets community of mental health advocates

Pam Reitman greets community of mental health advocates

opportunity to meet a spectrum of advocates for mental health.

My impressions and memories of the day:
2 friends carpooled with me.  It was already minutes past noon when I drove up to 301 14th Ave. at Clement St.  I dropped off my friends.   Scanning down the street, I was ready to park many blocks from the Beth Sholom. I couldn’t believe my eyes when half a block down the street, there was a space!  Mom! My parking angel!
Who drives by looking for parking but another friend I had shared the invitation with.
The first person I encountered was a volunteer who opened the glass door and greeted me with a smile.  “Here for the conference?” he asked.  “Up the stairs to the Koret Hall.”
My friends were signing in.  A volunteer handed me a program and welcomed me. I chatted with another volunteer who asked me “Teresa, what do you do?”  “I write stories for those who cannot speak for themselves.”  She told me about her son’s experience at camp—how the one activity he could connect with was story-telling.
A female voice from stage announced the start of the conference. Pam Reitman looked lovely in a black/white/sage Piccaso-ish dress. She welcomed us, told us about the committee’s dedication to making the conference a reality, the history of Bay Area Jewish Healing Center, her personal story. It was hearing Pam’s personal story several years ago that had attracted me to her writing about mental illness.
Rabbi Hyman greeted us with “Nachamu, Nachamu” (Comfort, Comfort).”  He and Rabbi Kukla did in fact create an atmosphere of comfort.  I even sang along a simple song in Hebrew.  A cello player.

Rabbi Hymand and Rabbi Kukla say: "Nachamu, Nachamu"

Rabbi Hymand and Rabbi Kukla say: "Nachamu, Nachamu"

6 panelists shared personal stories.
“I didn’t know we had mental illness in the family until my father suffered from depression, then I found out that his father had mental illness. I had clinical depression after I gave birth.”
“Friends and neighbors bring food when you have a broken leg. They don’t when you have mental illness.”
“There’s stigma on mental illness even among physicians. When I was in medical school, I knew I wanted to be a psychiatrist, but, my classmates looked down at me because they were going to be general practitioners and surgeons.”
“I thought that what I was going through was typical teenage misery. Then in grad school I was feeling happy and confident for the first time, but, I wasn’t sleeping, I wasn’t eating, and I was talking to myself. I thought I was the reincarnation of the person that I was writing about in a research paper; that’s when I knew that something was strange. The book An Unquiet Mind catapulted me to call my friend and seek help. Ten years later, I went back to grad school and became a doctor.”
“Stigmas.  We hide behind the illness, knowing other people would ostracize us. We wouldn’t have to hide behind other illnesses.”
“Psychic history.” “Holocaust survivors… intergenerational healing.”
The audience was given index cards to write questions for the 6 panelists. After several questions were addressed, and the volunteers were collecting more cards from the audience, there was silence. Rabbi Hyman said there was no hurry to fill the moment with words. Filling the moment with silence was lovely.
More questions and responses.
“Isolation.”  “Shame.” “Hope.”
“Some people think we have to find meaning in every experience. What about finding leap of faith instead?”
“Stigma.”
“When I don’t hear from my son, I double-up the efforts to call him.”
“You can continue communicating even though your loved one is not.”
“There’s no distinction in the way I treat this person and that person. I treat everyone with respect.”

Pam Reitman & Teresa LeYung Ryan write about loved ones with mental illness

Pam Reitman & Teresa LeYung Ryan write about loved ones with mental illness

Refreshments. Pineapple, watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, strawberries. Danishes, glazed donuts.  I chatted with a yoga teacher. We talked about our moms—how much we miss them.
Breakout sessions.   I was in the group facilitated by Steve Foreman and Sharon Roth. In the library. 11 in the group. We sat in a circle. “What would you like to suggest to the planning committee to make this conference more assessable?” “How to connect with folks who are isolated?” “Volunteerism.” “NAMI” “Why is it when I read a news item about a violent crime, there’s mentioning that the suspect has mental illness as though it’s implied that mental illness leads to violence…?”
“What else can we do to help build a caring community for mental illness if we don’t have time to volunteer?” “Call or email legislative representatives and remind them to include mental health in healthcare reform.” “Share stories.” “Create a blog and invite everyone to tell their mental illness story. Offer resources on the blog.”
Then we gathered in the Main Sanctuary to hear reports from all the breakout sessions. Closing ritual that included prayers and songs.  During prayers, I saw my mom on a swing!  That was the first time I pictured her in that playful act.
A lovely day indeed.
It’s Wednesday, Sept. 2nd, and I Googled “An Unquiet Mind” (the book that had helped Dr. Karin Tamerius, one of the panelist on Sunday).  YouTube had “Personal Reflections on Manic-Depressive Illness” from the Research Channel series.  Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison told her personal story. Such courage to open up about her disease (mania, suicidal depression) and her struggles with medication (side effect that were severely debilitating) that ultimately helped her. Stigmas. Personal and professional reprisals.  Who else could really understand what the patients are experiencing?  She ended her speech about the role of love in recovery.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxRLap9xLag
I’m thinking about Carmen Lee’s organization:  Stamp Out Stigma  http://stampoutstigma.org/
and National Alliance of Mental Illess   http://nami.org/
and my mom.

Subscribe to my blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives