Posts Tagged ‘shingles’

2021 August 14, 21:08  California

 

Dear Reader,

I hope you are well.

Several people I care about are struggling with illnesses and side effects of medications. This blog post is to share what Dr. Danielle Rosenman has taught me – to retrain Beautiful Brain to wellness.

Dr. Rosenman herself needs our prayers and well wishes right now.  She needs her “bag of tricks”.  I hope Dr. Rosenman’s family members have photos of her in every room, in her field of vision, so that her Beautiful Brain can “register” her own vibrancy. “Seeing” one’s vitality helps Beautiful Brain relearn wellness.  May Dr. Rosenman enjoy complete wellness soon.

[When we don't have photos or when we have weak or no eyesight  or when no one is around to help us - we send our thoughts to memories of our vibrant selves. ]

During neuroplasticity coaching, Dr. Danielle Rosenman instructs:  “Smile for yourself and talk out loud to your brain. When you learn to talk to your brain, you are opening up a new life.”

A thousand thanks to Dr. Rosenman for the coaching sessions, and to Dr. Michael Moskowitz and Dr. Marla Golden for their magnificent workbook and webinars, to Professor Lorimer Moseley for his wonderful presentations (find him on YouTube), to Dr. Victoria Sweet for instilling appreciation of “slow medicine”, to Dr. Norman Doidge for his books (find him on YouTube), Dr. Amy Grace Lam for extraordinary healing, and, of course to all the dear hearts who care about my well-being.

Thank you, Loduskia “Dusky” Pierce, for leading me to Dr. Doidge’s books. Thank you, Linda Harris, for remembering that Dr. Rosenman uses Dr. Moskowitz’s techniques.

 

Prior to August 2020 . . .  “Shingles”  “chickenpox reactivated”  “postherpetic neuralgia”  “persistent pain”  “neurological disorder” “keloid scars”   were just words to me.

When Shingles rash broke out, and the pain, oh the acute pain  (thank you dear Linda Harris and GH for your loving care) . . . my primary care physician prescribed Gabapentin, in addition to Tylenol and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.  After the rash began to heal … but the pain would not go away  (persistent pain) and depression set in …. I was in bigger trouble.

 

In his engaging talks, Professor Lorimer Moseley explains:

“If you have a brain, you will experience pain. If you don’t have a brain, you won’t experience pain.

“We feel pain in our body, and, we feel it in a particular location, but, it is impossible to feel pain without a brain, and, it is completely possible to feel pain without the body part.

“Pain is our most sophisticated protective device.”

“The term ‘neuroplasticity‘ refers to the adaptability of our nervous system. The other side of neuroplasticity is sometimes called ‘the dark side’.

“The mechanisms that cause us to change in a good way can also cause us to change in a way that makes our lives more difficult and more unpleasant.”

 

Unpleasant sensations?  Pain. Depression. Anxiety. Dizziness. And, what I call “Ick”

 

 Truths help me persevere in retraining “Beautiful Brain” (“BB”)

 

From Dr. Moskowitz’s and Dr. Golden’s workbook, from Dr. Rosenman’s guide, from Professor Moseley’s talks, from (Teresa Jade LeYung) my own experiences:

  • The brain doesn’t just receive information from the body, but sends directions back out to tell the body what to do.

  • The brain “reads” everything going on in the body 30 times a second for an entire life.

  • The adult brain changes throughout our lives based upon the information it receives from our bodies

  • The brain changes whenever we learn to do something new or when we stop doing something

  • The brain stores not only all my experiences, but also, everything I’ve watched and heard, in addition to genetic information

  • The adaptable nervous system – adaptability which scientists call neuroplasticity.

  • Without the thinking conscious brain, I wouldn’t feel any sensation – pleasant ones or unpleasant ones.

  • What is the antidote for pain, depression, anxiety, and other unpleasant symptoms?  PLEASURE.

  • Beautiful Brains (doing their jobs to protect Body Tissue) can make mistakes, mistakes that deplete vitality.

  • Thank goodness BBs (even when stubborn) can be retrained!

  • The simple act of smiling for myself  helps BB’s natural production of chemicals that include GABA, Anandamide, Endorphins, Oxytocin.

  • My BB is THE expert of my experiences; however the expert can and does make mistakes; I can retrain BB to gain wellness

I was successful retraining Beautiful Brain (“BB”) to stop sending pain signals.  My troubles were over . . . so I thought.

Gradually, pain morphed into another unpleasant symptoms / awful sensation. It even spread to parts of the body that never had Shingles rash.

[2021 August 15, 12:03pm Addendum –

Also, Beautiful Brain reactivates pain signals from past injuries (in my hand and in my knee). BB’s wanting to protect body tissue, so BB sends signals to grab my attention, except grabbing my attention this way saps my energy.  It’s like an alarm clock’s “snooze” setting in malfunction, going off at random.]

Remembering what Professor Moseley said -  that “Pain is our most sophisticated protective device” – and what my mentor (author Margaret Davis) said to me: “Teresa, can’t you apply the very same techniques you used to retrain your brain on pain to rid this undesirable sensation?”

YES, I can.

Through their workbook, Dr. Michael Moskowitz and Dr. Marla Golden instruct: ” … harness the power of our brains.”   On the last page of their workbook, they leave us with plenty of hope: “Neuroplastic Transformation opens a new approach to treating people living with persistent pain ….   The overarching message is that persistent pain can be challenged and defeated  by using the same principles that have created it.”

Interrupt unpleasant signals with pleasurable …

- THOUGHTS

- IMAGES

- SENSATIONS

- MEMORIES

- SOOTHING EMOTIONS

- MOVEMENT

- BELIEFS

 

Dr. Michael Moskowitz and Dr. Marla Golden http://neuroplastix.com/

 

 

My February 11, 2021 blog post “Brain / Pain Scientist Professor Lorimer Moseley uses humor to help us understand Dark Side of Pain” is at:

https://lovemadeofheart.com/blog/brain-pain-scientist-professor-lorimer-moseley-uses-humor-to-help-us-understand-dark-side-of-pain/

which highlights  “Getting a grip on pain and the brain – Professor Lorimer Moseley - Successful Ageing Seminar 2013?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p6sbi_0lLc

 

I am convinced that one safe place is my own thoughts. However the same place could be my enemy, so, it’s up to my will power to go to safe thoughts, beautiful thoughts, healing thoughts. The words in my thoughts hold much power.

 

 

I am one of the fortunate ones – to live with housemates who care about me, in a pleasant environment, and in a position to shelter-in-place during this pandemic.

Other folks are not so fortunate – their external world could be chaotic, even traumatic …  The only safe place could be their beautiful thoughts.

 

I remember Dr. Danielle Rosenman telling me during neuroplasticity coaching:  “Smile for yourself and talk out loud to your brain. When you learn to talk to your brain, you are opening up a new life.”

Also I remember how she taught me to create my unique “bag of tricks” to retrain Beautiful Brain (small items to look at, to smell, to touch…to recall pleasure, vibrancy, peace).  But, what about when there is no physical “bag of tricks”?   I have my thoughts! Thoughts of Beauty!  No no can take that away from me.

This blog post has taken many hours over many days – this is what it’s like to work while retraining Beautiful Brain with a neurological disorder

2021 August 4, 02:02-02:38; 15:54; August 5, 18:48; August 6, 14:55, 23:56; August 7, 00:10; 21:57; August 8, 13:56; August 10, 12:58pm; August 11, 17:17, August 12, 13:44; August 13, 17:14; August 14, 20:45  California

 

Thank you for reading this blog post  “Retraining Beautiful Brain By Rewriting My Personal Truths With Wordplay” by  Teresa Jade LeYung

 

For other posts related to our Beautiful Brains and Neuroplasticity  in my blog  https://lovemadeofheart.com/blog …  If you look at right side of screen, you’ll see the category “Beautiful Brains Neuroplasticity”.  Please click on that category to get all my blog posts pertaining to the topic.

 

I wish you and your Beautiful Brain safety, kindness, excellent health.

Sincerely,

Teresa Jade LeYung

photo of Teresa Jade LeYung in Paris by Nan and Sasa October 2018

*****

Thank you, MT et MYW, for masks; Starry Starry Night mask by Dahlynn & Ken of WoodstockAndYarn at Etsy

 

Story Consultant and Photo Historian Teresa Jade LeYung says: “I love helping writers identify the themes in their manuscripts to hook readers, and, build and fortify their platforms before and after publication. Reach out, not stress out.”
Love Made Of Heart ®

Blog Post #601

2021 Feb 2, 22:08–22:43;  Feb 6, 22:15–; Feb 8, 00:54–; Feb. 9, 21:21–; Feb. 11, 01:06–; Feb. 12, 01:45; amended Feb. 13; amended Feb. 15

Story Continuity / Theme Consultant Teresa Jade LeYung says…

Thank you to all the precious people in my life who have given me joyful memories – elixirs as I journey through the dark side of pain, practice neuroplasticity … to achieve wellness.

The experts and resources for wellness I found in 2015 to help my papa and friends are now helping me as I retrain my Brain to STOP sending my body pain signals and other unpleasant sensations after a bout of shingles last year. (According to Mayo Clinic… “After you’ve had chickenpox, the virus lies inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles…. Some people experience shingles pain without ever developing the rash.”)

I am forever grateful to Dusky Pierce, MFT who led me to Dr. Norman Doidge’s books (about neuroplasticity/our beautiful adaptable brains) which introduced me to methods developed by Dr. Moshé Feldenkrais, and, to Dr. Michael Moskowitz.  Also, I am forever grateful to Linda A. Harris for remembering Dr. Danielle Rosenman https://www.medicalcounseling.net/; Dr. Rosenman (trained by Dr. Moskowitz)  has coached me to practice neuroplasticity for wellness.

Techniques are simple, the journey not so easy.  Persistent pain signals and other unpleasant sensations BE GONE BE GONE!

A unique aspect of retraining Beautiful Brain (BB) to rid persistent pain is not to talk about it.  BB is so good at creating pain, my talking about it and thinking about it only sabotage my healing.

During a webinar with Dr. Michael Moskowitz and Dr. Marla Golden http://www.neuroplastix.com, Dr. Moskowitz recommended listening to Professor Lorimer Moseley talk about our brains and neuroplasticity – that Professor Moseley uses humor in his presentations.

This blog post contains my notes from –

“Getting a grip on pain and the brain – Professor Lorimer Moseley -

Successful Ageing Seminar 2013″

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p6sbi_0lLc

 

“What we now understand about pain.”

 

The term “neuroplasticity”  = how adaptable our nervous system is. The other side of neuroplasticity is sometimes called “the dark side.”

“The mechanisms that cause us to change in a good way can also cause us to change in a way that makes our lives more difficult and more unpleasant.

“If you have a brain, you will experience pain. If you don’t have a brain, you won’t experience pain.

“We feel pain in our body, and, we feel it in a particular location, but, it is impossible to feel pain without a brain, and, it is completely possible to feel pain without the body part.”

Professor Moseley tells his story  about encountering a man (with wooden leg) who was in agonizing pain (where his leg would have been). The man experienced SEVERE pain but he had NO tissue damage.

 

“The brain produces pain.  The brain does not recognize pain coming from something else.”

“Chronic pain is misunderstood.”

 

All images are from “ Getting a grip on pain and the brain – Professor Lorimer Moseley - Successful Ageing Seminar 2013″

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p6sbi_0lLc

 World’s most burdensome Health Issues

 

#1 Chronic back pain

#2 Depression

#4 Chronic neck pain

#8 Migraine and headache

#9 Diabetes

#11 Osteoarthritis

 

“Pain is our most sophisticated protective device.”

Nociceptors – detection of tissue damage or danger = danger receptors

[  Example from me, Teresa - at age 8, I touched a hot iron.  The nerves in my finger sent messages to my brain which then instantaneously sent pain to protect me; the pain stopped me from continuing touching the source of danger. ]

Professor Moseley gave example:  Violinists.  Pain threshold of their left little finger is lower than pain threshold of their right little finger. Why? Left little finger is used to play the instrument while right little finger could be missing but musician would still be able to hold the bow. Fingers on left hand need more protection; brain is more protective of left hand.

For Professor Moseley’s talk “Getting a grip on pain and the brain” go to:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p6sbi_0lLc

 

 

 

**

You can experience SEVERE pain but have NO damage.

AND

You can experience NO pain but have severe damage.

 

Brain produces pain.  Brain is the most trainable we’ve got!

Pain depends on how much danger your brain THINKS you are in, not how much danger you are really in.

 

Information gets stored in the brain. Brain uses information to evaluate danger to your body. Does Brain think this situation is more dangerous or less dangerous? If Brain’s conclusion is “this is dangerous”, Brain sends pain.

[  Teresa here…

Even though shingles rash healed completely last year… the scar tissue is red.  The color “red” has meaning for my Brain.   “Red” represents “hot” and “dangerous”.  My Brain remembers the hot iron incident from my childhood, and, all my experiences with pain. Brain evaluates all that information and concludes that I still need protecting, so, Brain does what Brain does so well . . . create pain signals to protect me. I can’t sip hot tea or stand in front of a hot stove for more than a minute … before Brain sends signals to “protect” me.  How I retrain my brain (“interrupt” unpleasant signals) are summarized in my blog posts published on November 6, 2020, January 3, 2021, and January 13, 2021. Since our brains are unique (the way our fingerprints are unique), what works for me might not work for someone else. Not only do our brains record our experiences, but also incidents we’ve witnessed, heard about, read about.

If my brain had ignored what I had read and heard

(from Mayo Clinic site, medical experts, and my own memory of a loved one describing her experience with shingles) – “that the condition can be very painful … that the most common complication is postherpetic neuralgia, which causes shingles pain for a long time after your blisters have cleared…”

then I wouldn’t be feeling pain now. ]

 

 

All images are from “ Getting a grip on pain and the brain – Professor Lorimer Moseley - Successful Ageing Seminar 2013?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p6sbi_0lLc

 

**

What you’re seeing is produced by the brain.  According to meaning!

At about 19 minutes and 39 seconds into his talk, Professor Moseley shows this slide on the screen to demonstrate how our “visual experience depends on the evaluation of sensory input.”

We see a checkerboard of white and gray squares; the greenish cylinder is casting shadows on some of the squares.  The square that has “A” on it appears to be gray. The square that has “B” on it appears to be white.

Retinal information is sent to the Brain,  then the Brain gathers everything else we’ve learned in our entire life – for meaning.

Professor Moseley then extracts these two squares from the board – the two square are the same color!  They are the same color when no other data are presented to create meaning.

 

 

Our brain produces a different picture when it evaluates our experiences, contexts, and environment … for meaning.

You are seeing this, but, it’s not really there. Like pain. You are feeling it because the brain produces it.

Professor Moseley shows  more examples . . .

” … the nature of your relationship, the roles that you have in society, the role in that context affects your pain. Not how you cope with your pain…  It doesn’t change the ‘danger message,’  it changes the pain. ”

 

How dangerous is this, really?

When Brain concludes that the situation is dangerous, Brain will send pain signals, even when reality is not dangerous.

And vice versa . . .

 At about 22 minutes and 30 seconds into his talk, Professor Moseley shows the slide of the runner who fractured his leg during triple jump at American Olympics Trials.  The runner’s brain evaluated his priorities and ignored the danger messages. Even though his body was experiencing severe damage … his brain didn’t send pain … until he looked down at his knee.

 

 

Pain depends on how much danger your brain THINKS you are in, not how much danger you are really in.

At about 25 minutes and 10 seconds into his talk,  Professor Lorimer Moseley shares personal experience.

He was walking in the bush, felt something on his outer leg.

How dangerous is this, really?  He has walked in this setting hundreds of time.

Danger receptors in Body and Brain; nerves influence other nerves.  His visual cortex plus memory circuits concluded that the sensation is the result of a twig scratching the skin of his leg.

He swam. He woke up 4 days later, had been bitten by Eastern Brown snake.

High danger but felt low pain.

Nine months later, walking in the bush again. He felt something on his outer leg. This time his brain sent harsh pain to protect him. When he looked down, this time it was just a twig.  Very low danger but felt severe pain.

 

**

at 34 minutes, Professor Lorimer Moseley talks about “The Brain’s evaluation of danger.”

All these systems that end up producing pain become more sensitive the longer you have pain.

Your systems learn how to make pain, so, you need less and less to aggravate your pain.

Things that don’t seem related can aggravate your pain.

Need to untangle the system.

Pain depends on how much danger my brain THINKS I am in, not how much danger I am really in.

[ Teresa here …  Our neighbors are modifying their house to “age in place” – construction workers hammering, using power tools … Monday through Friday.  The noise is impacting everyone’s tranquility, but, not everyone is experiencing pain the way I am.  Thank you, Dr. Amy Grace Lam, for helping me decipher why my brain has concluded that noise is dangerous. I had (but my brain and body have not) forgotten … about another time in my life when noise from neighbors impacted my health, forcing me to leave a lovely home.  So now my brain protects me by sending me pain and other unpleasant sensations. What beautiful brain-body communications we have!]

At 35 minutes, Professor Moseley gives additional data regarding the Dark Side of Neuroplasticity

“One in five Westerners  have chronic pain that disable them. The majority…  we can’t explain in their bodies. Understand what contributes to pain….”

 

 

What implies “Threat” to body tissue?

What implies “Safety”?

 

at 38 minutes and 20 seconds into his talk, Professor Moseley says:

“Aging system, less responsive. Sensitized system, more protective. Not just activity that Brain is exposed to. Anything that the Brain finds as threat.”

[ Teresa here … I was studying two Charles Chaplin  movies – both scripts are brilliant. However, the themes in MONSIEUR VERDOUX (1947) sparked pain signals; two scenes in A KING IN NEW YORK (1957) did the same. ]

 

The longer you have pain, the better your system gets at producing it.


 

The good news:  My body and brain are adaptable and will change if I train them.

I am determined to walk and imagine my way to wellness!

This is my journey. All that I have learned from people who care about people have brought me here. I thank you with all my heart.


I wish everyone excellent health, kindness, and sweet laughter.

Thank you for reading my blog post “Brain / Pain Scientist Professor Lorimer Moseley uses humor to help us understand the Dark Side of Pain” 

Again, thank you, Dr. Michael Moskowitz, for recommending Professor Lorimer Moseley’s talks.

Having been coached by Dr. Danielle Rosenman, and, remembering what I’ve learned from Dusky Pierce (Byron Katie https://thework.com/), and now using the workbook TRANSFORMING THE BRAIN IN PAIN: NEUROPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION  by Dr. Michael Moskowitz and Dr. Marla Golden . . . I am keeping my BB busy!


2021 January 30 Haiku poem  by  Teresa Jade LeYung

Brain much too busy

to send Body pain signals

during walk, must walk.

 

If I cannot walk

I imagine legs walking

step by step by step

 

For other posts in my blog, please go to: https://lovemadeofheart.com/blog   If you look at right side of screen, you’ll see the category “Beautiful Brains Neuroplasticity”. Please click on that category to get all my blog posts pertaining to our our Beautiful Brains and Neuroplasticity.

 

 

 

 

 

Love Made Of Heart ®

Story Continuity / Theme Consultant Teresa Jade LeYung offers resources regarding our beautiful  brains  / persistent pain / depression  / wellness through her Blog: http://lovemadeofheart.com/blog/

Teresa Jade LeYung, an American naturalized citizen of Chinese ancestry, is a story/theme consultant, author of LOVE MADE OF HEARTJourney Through Mental Illness (daughter-mother novel archived at the San Francisco History Center and used by college professors), BUILD YOUR WRITER’S PLATFORM & FANBASE IN 22 DAYS (a workbook), and TALKING TO MY DEAD MOM Monologues (the first monologue received an award from Redwood Writers Ten-Minute Play Festival), an advocate for public libraries and public schools, creator of http://lovemadeofheart.com/blog/ , and, admirer of City of Light. Composing Haiku poems is a new love for LeYung.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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